Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘food’

celery

I’m not a big fan of “dieting” — a word that conjures up images of hunger and chewing on celery or doing some kind of fad diet — but I do believe in trying to eat a healthier diet.

Don’t diet, but do stick to a healthy diet, in other words.

But that’s easier said than done, as we all know. The healthy diet goes out the window around the holidays, for example, or when there’s a family party or a function at work full of unhealthy food, or when we go out to eat with friends, or when we go to a ballgame or amusement park or the beach, or when … well, you get the idea. There are lots of ways to get off a diet.

And there are just as many ways to stick to your healthy diet.

I’m not perfect, by any stretch of the imagination, and I often will give in to temptations. But I’ve gotten better over time, partially because practice makes perfect and partly because I’ve learned a lot of great tips, from my fellow bloggers and from you, my favorite readers in the world.

So today we’re going to look at a few of the tips and tricks that I’ve found useful in sticking with a healthy diet.

1. Know your motivation. I have a friend, Jerry, who is getting healthy so that he’ll be alive and well to see his 3-year-old son grow up. When he gets tempted by evil junk food, he asks himself whether he’d rather eat the sweets or see his son grow up. When you have a powerful motivation like this, and remember what choice you’re making whenever you face temptation, it’s easier to be strong when you’d otherwise cave in.

2. Take it in gradual steps. You don’t have to overhaul your diet overnight. I highly recommend changing your diet in small steps — just drink water instead of soda, for example, or eat fruit instead of candy or chips. Once you adjust to this small change, make another a week or two later, and so on until you’re eating much healthier a few months later. This small and gradual process makes it much easier to stick with a healthy diet.

3. Don’t be drastic. I’ve seen fad diets like the Cookie Diet, Atkins, the Banana Diet, and different cleansing fasts — and I don’t recommend a single one of them. They’re drastic, and very few people can last with them for a long time. And the fact is, while you might lose a lot of weight with a drastic diet in a short amount of time, as soon as you get off the diet and go back to eating unhealthily, you’ll gain the wait back. Don’t do anything drastic — make long-lasting changes.

4. Choose foods you love. This is incredibly important. If you hate eating salads, don’t make salads a key to your new diet. I happen to love salads, but everyone has different tastes. Don’t eat foods just because they’re good for you — eat them because they’re healthy AND you love them. For me, that means berries and almonds and oatmeal and salads and yogurt and cottage cheese and tofu, but for others it might be salmon and lean grass-fed beef and asparagus and walnuts. Find the foods you love that are healthy, and you’ll stick with the diet much longer.

5. Pack food. Always bring healthy food with you, wherever you go. Sometimes this just means packing snacks if you’re going on a few errands (I like almonds and fruit), other times you might want to pack more substantial meals and pack them with ice to keep them fresh. Packing your lunch to work is a great idea, along with a bunch of snacks to keep you satisfied all day without eating the donuts someone brought in.

6. Eat before you go. If you’re going out to a restaurant or party, eat a small healthy meal first. That way you won’t be starving and won’t need to eat a huge amount of unhealthy food. You can get by on a salad or some fish and steamed veggies or an appetizer or something like that, and still enjoy the company of your friends and loved ones.

7. Don’t get hungry. When you allow yourself to starve, you will often binge, because your blood-sugar levels are so low that you crave instant sugar (or refined flour). When you’re starving, you are more likely to indulge in donuts or cake. So eat snacks throughout the day, or small meals, so that you never get super hungry.

8. Choose healthy when you eat out. If you go to a restaurant or party, look for the healthy choices. I love a good salad bar, but you could also choose a lean cut of meat, grilled not fried, with steamed veggies, or some black bean or lentil soup, or something like that.

9. Indulge in little bits. I don’t believe in going extreme and not allowing myself to eat treats such as … mmm, chocolate cake. But the key is to eat healthy most of the time, and when you do indulge in a treat, do it in small amounts. Two or three bites of cake or ice cream, for example, won’t kill your diet but will satisfy your sweet craving. Eating a whole tub of ice cream? Not recommended.

10. Eat small portions when you go out. If you go to a party with lots of food, try for small portions. Just eat until you’re slightly full, then have some water and talk with people without eating for awhile, then when you get hungry have another small portion, and so on. Try for the amount of food that will fit in your hand. If you space out several small portions over the course of a couple hours, you’ll feel satisfied but never take in too much.

11. Have tasty substitutes for your weaknesses. When I feel like eating something sweet, I’ll often have berries or fruit. My sister Kat likes to mix berries with almond butter, chocolate protein powder, and water — a weird but satisfying treat. Whatever your weaknesses, find a substitute that will satisfy your cravings when they inevitably come up.

12. Clear your home of unhealthy snacks and foods. If you have junk food in your home, you’re more likely to give in at some point and eat it. But if you clear your home of these foods, you won’t have that temptation. Clear your fridge and cabinets of candy, baked sweets, fried foods, foods made with refined flour, fatty and greasy things like chips and fries, and so on.

13. Bring your own healthy food to a party. If it’s allowed, bring a dish to a party you’re planning on attending, and make it a healthy one. I like to bring a couple of my favorites: Leo’s chili, and my Best Soup Ever.

14. Fill yourself up with water, fruits, veggies, and lean protein at a party. Lots of parties will have at least a couple of healthy options — some fruits or veggies, maybe some lean protein that’s not fried. I will fill myself up on these, even if they’re not entirely a meal, and then eat a healthy meal later.

15. Don’t stuff yourself. Make this your ultimate rule. Even if you break down and get fatty, fried food at a restaurant or party, just don’t eat until you’re stuffed. Try the Okinawan rule of eating until you’re 80% full. This way you can eat the unhealthy stuff and still limit the damage.

16. Don’t starve yourself. This might sound like the “don’t get hungry” tip above, but it’s bigger than that — don’t eat so little that you’re starving. For most women, that means don’t go below 1,200 calories a day — for men, it’s 1,500. But even those are too low for many of us. You only want to cut a moderate amount of calories from your diet — if you starve yourself, you’ll lose muscle, you’ll get unhealthy and you’ll end up falling off the diet eventually.

17. If you indulge, burn it off. Sometimes all of the strategies above will fail. That’s OK. Don’t beat yourself up about it — just get back on the wagon, back on track. Look at it as a small bump in the road. And better yet, get outside and burn off the calories by running, walking briskly, playing sports, whatever it takes. Then start eating healthy again.

Read Full Post »

pancake charlie

This pancake recipe is fairly kid friendly…well, except for the hot griddle and all. Adults will have to oversee the use of the griddle and give some instruction on pancake flipping.

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cup flour
  • 3 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 teaspoons butter (melted)
  • 1 1/4 cup milk
  • 1 egg
  • Cooking spray

Preparation:

In a large mixing bowl, add all dry ingredients — flour, baking powder, sugar and salt. Hollow out a place in the center of the dry ingredients.Melt butter in a microwave safe container (Set at low power for 20 seconds. It’s OK if it’s not completely melted.) Pour butter, milk, egg and vanilla in center of dry ingredients.

Using an electric mixer, with adult supervision, mix on low until all ingredients are well mixed. Use a spoon to scrape flour from the side of the bowl.

Spray griddle with cooking spray. Preheat electric griddle to 300 degrees. For a stove top griddle use medium-high heat. (For kids who are just learning to flip pancakes a griddle is recommended over a frying pan.)

Fill a ladle half full with batter and slowly pour on griddle. Repeat, leaving plenty of space between pancakes for easy flipping.

When pancakes are filled with small bubbles, gently slide a spatula under the pancake and flip. Cook for another 30-45 seconds and use spatula to lift off the griddle.

Important! While these “Kids Can Cook” recipes are written with kids in mind, they are not necessarily meant for kids to make without adult help. Kids’ ages and level of cooking knowledge will affect how much help they need in the kitchen. So kids, always ask your parents before cooking anything!

Read Full Post »

 fruit and veg444444

Sometimes I have a lot of food

On a very large plate.

Sometimes I cannot wait

To eat my fruit and veg.

I always know

It will help me grow,

Strengthen my bones

From tip to toe.

But sometimes I get fed up

With my fruit and veg.

I push my plate away

Then I hear my father say,

You won’t grow up

To reach the stars,

Or have the strength

Of three spacemen.”

I had to remind him then,

That I’m a teddy bear

That is no excuse,” he said,

You still have to eat

Your fruit and veg!”

Gillian Sims.

A poem from Manner Bear And Friends

Purchase this at amazon.com

SEND IN YOUR HEALTHY FOOD TIPS TO:

poetreecreations@yahoo.com

Read Full Post »

You perhaps know it as pancake day, but the day that falls before Ash Wednesday is really called Shrove Tuesday. It is the day on which people shrived, in order to prepare for the fasting that occurred during Lent. Shriving isn’t very common actability these days, but it meant eating up all the things in the cupboard that weren’t allowed to be eaten during Lent. One of the popular items made using these soon to be forbidden ingredients was pancakes, and thus in time the day became known a pancake day.

 

I must confess that I don’t really like pancakes, which may explain why we have such a limited offering of funny pancake day poems on the menu. If you don’t enjoy Pancake Day, Pancake Day, there’s only bread and water as an alternative.

 

Pancake Day Pancake Day

by Patrick

 

Pancake Day, Pancake Day

The pan’s getting hotter

The butter has melted

I’ve poured in the batter

 

Pancake Day, Pancake Day

The pancake is sizzling

A flick of the wrist

And its stuck to the ceiling

 

Pancake Day, Pancake Day

I’ve not seen mum crosser

So which did she call me

‘A champion tosser’

 

Oh, I hope I remembered to warn you that some adults will consider this poem rather rude!

Read Full Post »

 mountain

At the Store

1. Shop smart. Plan meals, use grocery lists, and avoid impulse buys. This way, you’re less likely to buy things you don’t need and that you’re unlikely to actually consume. Buy items only when you have a plan for using them, and wait until perishables are all used up before buying more. Check out these apps for extra-easy meal planning.

2. Buy exactly what you need. For example, if a recipe calls for two carrots, don’t buy a whole bag. Instead, buy loose produce so you can purchase the exact number you’ll use. Likewise, try buying grains, nuts, and spices from bulk bins so you can measure out exactly what you need and don’t over-buy (Just note that there’s a difference between buying in bulk and buying from bulk bins; the first one can actually create more waste if we buy more than we can realistically use). Bonus: This tip will save some cash, to boot.

3. Be realistic. If you live alone, you won’t need the same number of apples as a family of four (unless you really like apples). If you rarely cook, don’t stock up on goods that have to be cooked in order to be consumed (such as baking supplies or dried grains and beans).

4. Buy funny-looking produce. Many fruits and vegetables are thrown away because their size, shape, or colors don’t quite match what we think these items “should” look like. But for the most part these items are perfectly good to eat, and buying them at a farmer’s market or the grocery store helps use up food that might otherwise be tossed.

5. Have a Plan B. Let’s say you buy Camembert to make a fancy dish for that fancy dinner party — and then the dinner party is canceled. Don’t toss the cheese! Instead, come up with a backup recipe and use it in a different dish (or just eat it plain, because c’mon — it’s cheese).

At Home

6. Practice FIFO. It stands for First In, First Out. When unpacking groceries, move older products to the front of the fridge/freezer/pantry and put new products in the back. This way, you’re more likely to use up the older stuff before it expires.

7. Monitor what you throw away. Designate a week in which you write down everything you throw out on a regular basis. Tossing half a loaf of bread each week? Maybe it’s time to start freezing half that loaf the moment you buy it so it doesn’t go stale before you’re able to eat it.

8. Take stock. Note upcoming expiration dates on foods you already have at home, and plan meals around the products that are closest to their expiration. On a similar note, keep a list of what’s in the freezer and when each item was frozen. Place this on the freezer door for easy reference and use items before they pass their prime.

9. Designate one dinner each week as a “use-it-up” meal. Instead of cooking a new meal, look around in the cupboards and fridge for leftovers and other food that might otherwise get overlooked.

10. Eat leftovers! Brown-bag them for work or school for a free packed lunch. If you don’t want to eat leftovers the day after they’re cooked, freeze and save them for later (just remember to note when you froze them so you can use them up in a timely fashion).

11. Use it all. When cooking, use every piece of whatever food you’re cooking with, whenever possible. For example, leave the skin on cucumbers and potatoes, sauté broccoli stems along with the florets (they taste good too; we promise!), and so on. Bonus: Skins and stems often have provide additional nutrients for our bodies.

12. Store better. If you regularly throw away stale chips/cereal/crackers/etc., trystoring them in airtight containers — this should help them keep longer (or, of course, just buy fewer of these products).

13. Repurpose leftovers scraps. Use vegetable and meat scraps in homemade stocks, and use citrus fruit rinds and zest to add flavor to other meals. Want more ideas? Check out these resources for using up food scraps.

14. Check the fridge. Make sure it’s functioning at maximum efficiency. Look for tight seals, proper temperature, etc. — this will ensure that the fridge keeps food fresh as long as possible.

15. Preserve produce. Produce doesn’t have to be tossed just because it’s reaching the end of its peak. Soft fruit can be used in smoothies; wilting vegetables can be used in soups, etc. And both wilting fruits and veggies can be turned into delicious, nutritious juice.

16. Donate what you won’t use. Never going to eat that can of beans? Donate it to a food kitchen before it expires so it can be consumed by someone who needs it. Check out this resource to locate a food bank near you.

17. Donate the gross stuff, too! Many farmers happily accept food scraps for feeding pigs or adding to a compost heap. To find farms near you, check out one of these resources.

18. Store food properly in the fridge. Learn how and where to store specific products in the fridge, and they’re likely to keep longer (hint: they don’t call it the “produce drawer” for nothin’!).

19. Store things properly in the freezer. Same as above: How and where westore products in the freezer makes a difference in how long they’ll last.

20. Can it. Got more fruit than you know what to do with? Try canning it so it’ll last for months to come. (Plus, who doesn’t love eating “fresh” peaches in winter?)

21. Pickle it. Both fruits and vegetables can be preserved through an easy pickling process.

22. Understand expiration dates. Turns out those expiration dates don’t always have to do with food safety; rather, they’re usually manufacturers’ suggestions for peak quality. If stored properly, most foods (even meat) stay fresh several days past the “use-by” date. If a food looks, smells, and tastes okay, it should be fine. If any of these elements are off, then it’s time to toss it.

23. Compost! Hate potato skins? Don’t feel like turning wilted vegetables into soup stock? No worries; food scraps still don’t need to be tossed. Just start a compost pile in the backyard or even under the sink, and convert food waste into a useful resource.

During Mealtime

24. Check in with your belly. Here it is, ladies and gentlemen: The solution to the “clean your plate!” issue. Simply take a moment to ask your body what it wants to eat, and how much — and then serve yourself that. Or simply start with less food on your plate. If you want more, you can always go back for it — but this way you won’t find out that you’re full and still have a heap of food in front of you. In fact, one study found that reducing portion sizes is an easy way to reduce food waste [1].

25. Split the dish. If eating out, split a dish with a friend so you don’t waste half of the giant portion sizes found at many restaurants.

26. Take home leftovers. Even if you’re not into splitting meals, those portion sizes don’t have to be wasted. Just ask to take leftovers home (bonus eco points if you bring your own reusable container!), and you’ve got yourself a free lunch the next day.

27. Share. Made a quadruple recipe of a casserole you ended up disliking? Gift it to friends, family, or neighbors — they’re likely to be grateful for the saved money and time.

28. Go trayless. When eating in a cafeteria, skip the tray. Doing so is associated with a reduction in food waste, possibly because it’s harder for people to carry more food than they can actually eat.

29. Educate other people. Sure, nobody likes a Debbie Downer at the dinner table. But turns out simply being aware of the issue of food waste can help make people more attentive to wasting less [2].

How do you save on your weekly food bill?  Send your tips. Share with us. Make a comment.

Read Full Post »

fruits-of-labor1

Hundreds and thousands have toiled under the scorching sun of summer, 
to grow the food which so comfortably we eat.

think of food as the fruit of labor of thousands of hours, 
rather than just rice and wheat.

millions die due to lack of food, so is their fate, 
but we are lucky to have every time enough in our plate.

we may never go to the fields to produce the food, 
but my friend ‘food saved is food produced’.

so lets take a vow today to put in our plate only that much which we can eat, 
so that even a single single grain may not go waste. 

Sunny Mittal

Read Full Post »

KID PANCAKEKID PANCAKE

TOSSING A PANCAKE

Tossing a pancake

I can do that
Just get a fry pan
Heat up the fat
Mix up the batter
As easy as that
One on the ceiling
One on the cat
One on the door
One on the mat
One on my head
Like a sweet sticky hat

TOSSING THE PANCAKE

Tossing the pancake
How hard could it be?
Well quite difficult
Which surprised me
What an awful mess
After the first three
I gave up after four
That landed on me

I THOUGHT I’D TRY TOSSING A PANCAKE

I thought I would try tossing a pancake
Well that turned out to be a big mistake
The first three didn’t leave the pan at all
The next two were sliding down the wall
The only one dispatched with any grace
Then splashed hot fat right in my face

PANCAKE DAY

For the world at large shrove Tuesday
Precedes Ash Wednesday 
For my unfortunate family stove Tuesday
Precedes trash Wednesday

AT THE ANNUAL PANCAKE RACE

At the annual pancake race
The winner is always smug Trace
I’m always at the rear of the chase
Limping home in last place
Then I must congratulate Trace
And engage in a false embrace

When I really want to hear the base

Of the frying pan hitting her face

KID PANCAKEKID PANCAKE

                    

                     

                                        KEEP SAFE

                                                   IN

                                    THE KITCHEN

Read Full Post »

 

I’ve started on a see food diet.
I highly recommend you try it.
You eat whatever food you see;
a grape, a crepe, a pear, a pea,
a candy cane, some bubble gum,
a piece of pie, a peach, a plum,
banana pancakes, chicken legs,
a dozen donuts, deviled eggs,
spaghetti noodles, sirloin steaks,
vanilla ice cream, birthday cakes,
a hundred pizzas, chocolate mousse,
and gallon jugs of apple juice.

The see food diet. Just can’t beat it.

Whenever you see food, you eat it.
I’m pretty sure you won’t lose weight,
But, what the heck? The food is great!

–Kenn Nesbit

Read Full Post »

 
In the morning when I awake
still half asleep yearning for more
I often stop to think
what life was like living before.
 
When man had to forage for food
no Supermarkets in the land
things were not bought in packets
nothing was to hand.
 
When bread had to be baked at home
vegetables grown in a field
tea imported from India or China
you ate what your father could yield.
 
Clothing was made by the Mother or Wife
cows were milked in the barn
no chemicals then to make things last
materials were made of Yarn.
 
No wasteage created because of bulk
food mountians never created
no such thing as salmonella
were many deaths today were fated.
 
No refrigerators to keep the food
freezers not yet used
so how come nowadays we still have waste?
food has been abused.
 
Sell by dates, best before?
never heard of in the past
food was kept in a larder
not in bulk just enough to last.
 
Do not eat this? don’t touch that
its enough to drive you insane
diets for this allergies for that
meaningless and inane.
 
How many people died of food poison
in the days before sell by dates?
statistics say not very many
its in our time this fad dictates. 
BY WILLIAM MANSON
 
What did people do before the refrigerator? did you ever hear of sell by dates? best before years ago? no, because in this “careful” society of e numbers and what have you, people are scared into the fact that food cannot be eaten after a certian time? this is nonsense, eggs, milk etc never had sell by dates until recent times, fact.
 
Can you remember the days before refrigeration?

Read Full Post »

beans

Beans for breakfast.
Beans for lunch.
Beans for dinner.
Beans for brunch.
Beans for snacks

and all desserts.
Beans until your
stomach hurts.

This is called
the “All-Bean Diet.”
Man, it’s fun!
You have to try it!
True, it gives you
painful gas…
Still, it sure does
clear the class!

–Kenn Nesbitt

Read Full Post »

Ten Worst Foods

1. Artery Crust

Judging by the label, Stouffer’s Satisfying Servings (16 oz) White Meat Chicken Pot Pie has “only” 590 calories, 13 grams of saturated fat, and 930 mg of sodium. But those numbers are for only half a pie. Eat the entire pie, as many people do, and you’re talking 1,180 calories, 26 grams of saturated fat (more than a day’s worth), and 1,860 mg of sodium (over a day’s worth).

2. Triple Bypass

Can’t decide what to pick from a restaurant menu? No worries. Now you can order not just one entrée, but two… or three… all at once.Olive Garden’s Tour of Italy – Homemade Lasagna, Lightly Breaded Chicken Parmigiana, and Creamy Fettuccine Alfredo – comes with 1,450 calories, 33 grams of saturated fat, and 3,830 milligrams of sodium. Add a breadstick (150 calories and 400 mg of sodium) and a plate of Garden-Fresh Salad with dressing (350 calories and 1,930 mg of sodium) and you’ll consume almost 2,000 calories (an entire day’s worth) and 6,160 mg

3. Salt’s On!

On average, a cup ofCampbell’s Condensed soup has 760 mg of sodium. That’s half a day’s worth … assuming you eat only one of the 2½ servings that the label says the can makes. Campbell’s Healthy Request and Select Harvest, Progresso Reduced Sodium, and Healthy Choice slash the sodium to the 400s. Look for lower sodium lines in the 100s to 300s by Amy’s, Imagine Foods, Pacific Natural Foods, and Tabatchnick.

4. Tortilla Terror

Interested in a Chipotle Chicken Burrito (tortilla, rice, pinto beans, cheese, chicken, sour cream, and salsa)? Think of its 970 calories, and 18 grams of saturated fat as three 6-inch Subway BLT Classic Subs! Skipping the cheese or sour cream cuts the saturated fat to 6 grams, but you still end up with 750 calories and more than a day’s worth of sodium. Yikes!

5. Factory Reject

People don’t expect light desserts at The Cheesecake Factory. But the Chocolate Tower Truffle Cake kicks things up a notch. If it weren’t served on its side, this one would stand over six inches tall. And upright or not, the slab of cake still weighs in at three-quarters of a pound. What do you get for all that heft? Just 1,760 calories and 2½ days’ worth of saturated fat (50 grams), mostly from chocolate, sugar, cream, white flour, and butter.

6. Burial Grands

No one thinks of cinnamon rolls as health food. But each Pillsbury Grands! Cinnabon Cinnamon Roll with Icing has 310 calories and 2 grams of saturated fat plus 2½ grams of trans fat (more than a day’s worth) and 5 teaspoons of sugar. Companies are dumping their partially hydrogenated oils left and right, yet Pillsbury still makes most of its rolls and biscuits with the stuff.

7. Transgression

“Excellent source of ALA Omega 3,” declares the Land O’Lakes Margarine box. Who knew that Land O’Lakes stick margarine was so heart healthy? It isn’t. Each tablespoon of the spread has 2½ grams of trans fat (more than an entire day’s limit) and 2 grams of saturated fat. And beware of other trans-filled sticks by Blue Bonnet, Parkay, Country Crock, and Fleischmann’s. At least those brands don’t imply that a bit of ALA outweighs the harm caused by the margarine’s trans and saturated fat. Shopping tip: Look for tub margarines – most have little or no trans fat.

8. Starbucks on Steroids

The Starbucks Venti (20 oz) White Chocolate Mocha with 2% milk and whipped cream is more than a mere cup of coffee. It’s worse than a McDonald’s Quarter Pounder with Cheese. Few people have room in their diets for the 580 calories and 15 grams of saturated fat that this hefty beverage supplies. But you can lose 130 calories and almost two-thirds of the bad fat if you order it with nonfat milk and no whipped cream.

9. Extreme Ice Cream

An average halfcup serving ofHäagen-Dazs ice creamsqueezes half-a-day’s saturated fat and a third-of-a-day’s cholesterol into your artery walls and makes a nearly 300-calorie down-payment on your next set of fat cells – if you can stop at a petite half-cup!

10. Stone Cold

Cold Stone Creamery’s Oh Fudge! shake(chocolate ice cream, milk, and fudge syrup) starts at 1,250 calories for the “Like It” (16 oz) size. That’s more than a large (32 oz) McDonald’s McCafe Chocolate Triple Thick Shake. The “Love It” (20 oz) has 1,660 calories and the “Gotta Have It” (24 oz) reaches 1,920 calories (just about an entire day’s worth) and 69 grams of saturated fat (3½ days’ worth). That’s the saturated fat content of two 16 oz T-bone steaks plus a buttered baked potato, all blended into a handy 24 oz cup.

 

Ten Best Foods

1. Sweet Potatoes

A nutritional All-Star — one of the best vegetables you can eat. They’re loaded with carotenoids, vitamin C, potassium, and fiber. Bake and then mix in some unsweetened applesauce or crushed pineapple for extra moisture and sweetness.

2. Mangoes

Just one cup of mango supplies 100% of a day’s vitamin C, one-third of a day’s vitamin A, a decent dose of blood-pressure-lowering potassium, and 3 grams of fiber. Bonus: mango is one of the fruits least likely to have pesticide residues.

3. Unsweetened Greek Yogurt

Non-fat, plain Greek yogurt has a pleasant tartness that’s a perfect foil for the natural sweetness of berries, bananas, or your favorite breakfast cereal. It’s strained, so even the fat-free versions are thick and creamy. And the lost liquid means that the yogurt that’s left has twice the protein of ordinary yogurt – about 17 grams in 6 ounces of plain Greek yogurt.

4. Broccoli

It has lots of vitamin C, carotenoids, vitamin K and folic acid. Steam it just enough so that it’s still firm and add a sprinkle of red pepper flakes and a spritz of lemon juice.

5. Wild Salmon

The omega-3 fats in fatty fish like salmon can help reduce the risk of sudden-death heart attacks. And wild-caught salmon has less PCB contaminants than farmed salmon.

6. Crispbreads

Whole-grain rye crackers, like Wasa, Kavli, and Ryvita — usually called crispbreads — are loaded with fiber and often fat-free. Drizzle with a little honey and sprinkle with cinnamon to satisfy your sweet tooth.

7. Garbanzo Beans

All beans are good beans. They’re rich in protein, fiber, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. But garbanzos stand out because they’re so versatile. Just drain, rinse, and toss a handful on your green salad; throw them into vegetable stews, curries, and soups; mix them with brown rice, whole wheat couscous, bulgur, or other whole grains.

8. Watermelon

Watermelon is a heavyweight in the nutrient department. A standard serving (about 2 cups) has one-third of a day’s vitamins A and C, a nice shot of potassium, and a healthy dose of lycopene for only 80 fat-free, salt-free calories. And when they’re in season, watermelons are often locally grown, which means they may have a smaller carbon footprint than some other fruits.

9. Butternut Squash

Steam a sliced squash or buy peeled, diced butternut squash at the supermarket that’s ready to go into the oven, a stir-fry, or a soup. It’s an easy way to get lots of vitamins A and C and fiber.

10. Leafy Greens

Don’t miss out on powerhouse greens like kale, collards, spinach, turnip greens, mustard greens, and Swiss chard. These stand-out leafy greens are jam-packed with vitamins A, C, and K, folate, potassium, magnesium, calcium, iron, lutein, and fiber. Serve with a splash of lemon juice or red wine vinegar.

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Tabulampot

Tabulampot anggur, Jual tabulampot, Buat tabulampot, tabulampot durian montong, Tabulampot durian bawor, tabulampot durian berbuah, menanam di dalam drum, tabulampot durian merah, pohon durian pendek, cara menanam durian musang king, pohon durian bonsai, tabulampot jambu air, cara membuat tabulampot cepat berbuah, Cara menanam tabulampot, media tabulampot, tabulampot mangga, tabulampot jaboticaba, tabulampot kesemek, tabulampot lada perdu, tabulampot mamey sapote, tabulampot Cerry, tabulampot jambu kristal, tabulampot lengkeng new kristal, tabulampot lengkeng, tabulampot alpukat, tabulampot duwet, tabulampot tin, tabulampot sawo, tabulampot murah, tabulampot Salaman, tabulampot Magelang, tabulampot trubus

Buzz In The Snow

Know Your Limits And Break Them!

seenu625

love nature, and all things creative

Buffalo Tom Peabody's blog 2

The 9 Lives of Buffalo Tom Peabody, Gunther Tootie, Ignatius “IGGY” Rattlebottom-Bunn, Larry "Bubba" Flowers & Doodlesack. NO AWARDS. please.

Konfar

Hey!! I am 19 Year Old Girl live in New Delhi. I Start My Blog which Is All About Travel, Fashion, Lifestyle, Beauty, Skincare & Food Also😉. Hope You Love My Blogs. Stay Happy. Stay Positive

Sallyporte

Destinations & Obsessions blog

Onegoal24

You are sure to win

The Uptight Hippie

A garden of wild thoughts in straight little rows

ipekseyhanpoyrazkarayel

Asla İdeallerinden Vazgeçme Asla! Never Give Up Your İdeals Never!

The Sports Archives Blog

The Sports Media Center

Orlando Espinosa

Keep it Simple!

Grumpa Joe's Place

My Flag Flies Everyday

Garden of Words

of which vertu engendred is the fleur

Dr Ken Baker

Author, Speaker, Missioner

%d bloggers like this: