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“Cyber bullying” is defined as a young person tormenting, threatening, harassing, or embarrassing another young person using the Internet or other technologies, like cell phones.

The psychological and emotional outcomes of cyber bullying are similar to those of real-life bullying. The difference is, real-life bullying often ends when school ends. For cyber bullying, there is no escape. And, it’s getting worse. Read on to get the facts.

  1. Nearly 43% of kids have been bullied online. 1 in 4 has had it happen more than once.
  2. 70% of students report seeing frequent bullying online.
  3. Over 80% of teens use a cell phone regularly, making it the most common medium for cyber bullying.
  4. 68% of teens agree that cyber bullying is a serious problem.
  5. 81% of young people think bullying online is easier to get away with than bullying in person.
  6. 90% of teens who have seen social-media bullying say they have ignored it. 84% have seen others tell cyber bullies to stop.
  7. Only 1 in 10 victims will inform a parent or trusted adult of their abuse.
  8. Girls are about twice as likely as boys to be victims and perpetrators of cyber bullying.
  9. About 58% of kids admit someone has said mean or hurtful things to them online. More than 4 out 10 say it has happened more than once.
  10. About 75% have visited a website bashing another student.
  11. Bullying victims are 2 to 9 times more likely to consider committing suicide.

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“Polite Society’s” Purpose Vol. #2 Essay 19

This entry was posted on February 6, 2013, in Polite Society’s Purpose and tagged ,,. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment

Polite Society 1880s“Polite Society” is a term that came into use during the 1880s and it remainedpolite society 1950s with us until the 1950s. It refers to the behavior of the upper echelon of our society and is normally associated with the Protestants. Their behavior was guided by their strong Christian faith and their sincere concern for the feelings of others. Kindness was the rule of the day and both men and women behaved accordingly, in both their private and public lives.

I’m sure you’ve heard the saying, “If you can’t say anything nice, don’t say anything at all.” Well, because people were born and raised within the strict parameters of their Christian faith, keeping that promise was relatively easy, as well-bred people rarely stepped out of line, whether at home or at work. This was because the children were trained early on to be polite, hard-working, trustworthy and kind adults, thereby eliminating the need to criticise anyone’s behavior. Everyone played by the rules with wonderful results.

Today, this is no longer the case. We are surrounded by louts, not only at work but at home too.screaming womanscreaming customerscool kids misbevaeblack guy and bus driver

And once again, we can blame the radical, second wave feminists for the demise of another comforting and traditional component of America’s glorious past. The concept of a polite society has vanished from our landscape with chilling and disheartening results. Its loss has turned, what was once, a pleasant, courteous and peaceful society into a cynical, crude, rude, and obnoxious prison.woman with scissorsannoying co-workerbad little kids

Christian women have traditionally engendered genteel behavior by both men and women. They demanded to be treated with the respect that their good behavior entitled them to, all in accordance with the lessons learned in the Bible. The Bible teaches mankind the dignity and respect with which women were to be treated as both women and mothers. The Blessed Mother’s, Joseph and Jesus’ lives were the inspiration for the lives of all women and men.  Good behavior garnered reverence for the women, esteem for the men and respect for both. This understanding of what comprised good personal behavior was one of the key components of our civilized society. 

Feminist leader - Bella Abzug

When the radical, second-wave feminists and their socialist cohorts took advantage of the chaos surrounding the civil rights movement in the 1960s they started, what would become today’s rude society, eventually destroying polite society, by veering away from Christian behavior and instilling the “do-your-own-thing” mentality in our college age kids.  

And yet today, they stubbornly refuse to take blame for all of the evil behavior that followed their revolutions, both sexual and societal, despite the inability for anyone to find, anyone or anything, else to blame.

After their tirades and psychotic hissy-fits everything changed in America. Gone were the sexual mores of love, marriage and children. Gone were the ethical standards of good business practices. Gone were the merit based advancements in education. Gone were the promotions based on talent. Gone were the pride in country, flag and our military. Because, gone were the essential and basic human qualities only Christianity can develop in a culture. They were trashed along with everything else bequeathed to America by the sacrifices of the Christian men, during our American miracle.

 Every traditional, 1000 year old human value, standard of behavior, polite kindness and consoling commandment were dramatically and publicly trashed by the non-Christian likes of Gloria Steinem (radical feminist), Abby Hoffman (radical political activist), William Kunstler (leftist lawyer), Betty Friedan (feminist), Leonard Weinglass (radical’s lawyer) and, Jerry Rubin (social activist), in less than 10 years! With the help of the TV industry, which was in its infancy, these sick people and their ilk, grabbed the limelight and our country, to this very day, has not recovered.

Our daily preferences are glaring example of this decline – people routinely choose football over church; kids sports over family dinner; irresponsibly over responsibility; sex over love; procrastination over determination; globe over God; secularism over faith; career over children; clothes over character; rudeness over politeness; impulsiveness over patience; pets over people; friends over family; rash words over silence; selfishness over consideration; divorce over marriage; and dozens of other disastrous decisions.

And why do we choose to jump off the cliff rather than cherish our short time on earth? Because a group of dysfunctional females in the 1960s convinced millions of women that polite society was for wimps and that their way would break the bonds of patriarchy and oppression thereby allowing them to achieve ”independence” and ”to be all that they could be.”  ”I am woman, hear me roar!” YUK!               It’s the Women, Not the Men. to be continued

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1918

For a Child of 1918

My grandfather said to me
as we sat on the wagon seat,
“Be sure to remember to always
speak to everyone you meet.”

We met a stranger on foot.
My grandfather’s whip tapped his hat.
“Good day, sir. Good day. A fine day.”
And I said it and bowed where I sat.

Then we overtook a boy we knew
with his big pet crow on his shoulder.
“Always offer everyone a ride;
don’t forget that when you get older,”

my grandfather said. So Willy
climbed up with us, but the crow
gave a “Caw!” and flew off. I was worried.
How would he know where to go?

But he flew a little way at a time
from fence post to fence post, ahead;
and when Willy whistled he answered.
“A fine bird,” my grandfather said,

“and he’s well brought up. See, he answers
nicely when he’s spoken to.
Man or beast, that’s good manners.
Be sure that you both always do.”

When automobiles went by,
the dust hid the people’s faces,
but we shouted “Good day! Good day!
Fine day!” at the top of our voices.

When we came to Hustler Hill,
he said that the mare was tired, 
so we all got down and walked,
as our good manners required. 

 

2132_bishop_large
Elizabeth Bishop
Elizabeth Bishop (1911-1979) at the time of her death was respected as a “writer’s writer” on account of her technical mastery and exemplary patience and dedication to her craft. Since then her reputation has risen steadily until she has become one of the major figures of 20th century American poetry. 

She was born into a comfortable home in Worcester, Massachusetts, her father being a business executive with a successful family-owned construction firm. However, this security disappeared with the death of her father when Bishop was only 8 months old, and the subsequent mental illness of her mother who was permanently institutionalised in 1916. Though her mother lived in an asylum until 1934, Bishop never saw her again. She was brought up by a succession of relatives, firstly by her maternal grandparents in Nova Scotia, under whose care she was largely happy, then by her paternal grandparents back in Worcester and finally by her paternal aunt in whose home Bishop remained for the rest of her education. In 1929 she entered Vassar College where she began writing in earnest and where she met the older and already distinguished poet, Marianne Moore who became the first of several poetic friends and mentors.

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What child doesn’t love nursery rhymes? It is this love which has allowed so many of these tales to survive hundreds of years. While many nursery rhymes are innocent stories, some contain morals and others have sinister or political underlying meanings. This list looks at ten popular nursery rhymes and their origins (or speculated origins).

10

Humpty Dumpty
 
 

Humpty Dumpty 1 - Ww Denslow - Project Gutenberg Etext 18546

Humpty Dumpty was first printed in 1810. At the time, a humpty dumpty was a clumsy person, so the nursery rhyme was meant as a riddle. It doesn’t actually state that Humpty Dumpty is an egg, so the aim of the reader is to guess what he really is. Of course there is not a person who knows the tale these days that doesn’t know he is an egg. There is speculation that the nursery rhyme had an underlying meaning – in which Humpty Dumpty represents King Richard III of England and the wall his horse. Others have suggested that it refers to the downfall of Cardinal Wolsey at the hand of King Henry VIII.

9

Sing a Song of Sixpence
 
 

Songofsixpenc

Sing a song of sixpence dates back to at least the eighteenth century. In the original, the tale ends with a blackbird pecking off the nose of the maid in the garden; in the mid-nineteenth century this was sanitized with the addition of a final verse in which a doctor sews it back on. While interpretations vary wildly, the four and twenty blackbirds are most likely simply a reference to a common practice in the sixteenth-century in which large pies were baked then filled with live birds which would escape when the pie was cut. This stems from the fact that a meal was meant not just as nourishment, but entertainment.

8

Rock-a-bye Baby
 
 

Rockabyebaby-Willcox-Smith

Originally titled ‘Hushabye Baby’, this nursery rhyme was said to be the first poem written on American soil. Although there is no evidence as to when the lyrics were written, it may date from the seventeenth century and have been written by an English immigrant who observed the way native-American women rocked their babies in birch-bark cradles, which were suspended from the branches of trees, allowing the wind to rock the baby to sleep. An alternative interpretation states that the baby is the son of King James II of England, who was widely believed to be someone else’s child smuggled into the birthing room in order to provide a Catholic heir for James. In this interpretation, the cradle represents the Stuart monarchy.

7

Little Jack Horner
 
 

Picture 1-119

The first recorded version of Little Jack Horner comes from the eighteenth-century but it is most likely to have be known since the seventeenth. In the nineteenth century the story began to gain currency that the rhyme is actually about Thomas Horner, who steward to Richard Whiting, the last abbot of Glastonbury Abbey before the dissolution of the monasteries under Henry VIII of England. The story is reported that, prior to the abbey’s destruction, the abbot sent Horner to London with a huge Christmas pie which had the deeds to a dozen manors hidden within it and that during the journey Horner opened the pie and extracted the deeds of the manor of Mells in Somerset. It is further suggested that, since the manor properties included lead mines in the Mendip Hills, the plum is a pun on the Latin plumbum, for lead. The current owners of Mells Manor have stated that they doubt this interpretation.

6

Little Bo Peep

Little Bo Peep 2 - Ww Denslow - Project Gutenberg Etext 18546

The earliest record of this rhyme is in a manuscript of around 1805, which contains only the first verse. There are references to a children’s game called “Bo-Peep”, from the sixteenth century, including one in Shakespeare’s King Lear (Act I Scene iv), but little evidence that the rhyme existed. The additional verses are first recorded in the earliest printed version in a version of Gammer Gurton’s Garland or The Nursery Parnassus in 1810, making this one of the most modern nursery rhymes on the list.

 

 5

Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary
 
 

Maryquitecontrary

Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary has been seen as having religious and historical significance, but its origins and meaning are disputed as is often the case. The most common interpretation identifies “Mary” with Mary I of England. The “How does your garden grow?” may make mocking reference to her womb and the fact that she gave birth to no heirs, or to the common idea that England had become a Catholic vassal or “branch” of Spain and the Habsburgs, or may even be a punning reference to her chief minister, Stephen Gardiner (“gardener”). “Quite contrary” could be a reference to her attempt to reverse ecclesiastical changes made by her father Henry VIII and her brother Edward VI. The “pretty maids all in a row” could be a reference to miscarriages or her execution of Lady Jane Grey. Capitalizing on the Queen’s portrayal by Whig historians as “Bloody Mary”, the “silver bells and cockle shells” could be colloquialisms for instruments of torture.

4

Baa, Baa, Black Sheep
 
 

Denslow-Baa-Baa

Baa, Baa, Black Sheep is an eighteenth century nursery rhyme sung to the same tune as Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star. It is possible that this rhyme is a description of the medieval ‘Great’ or ‘Old Custom’ wool tax of 1275, which survived until the fifteenth century. Contrary to some commentaries, this tax did not involve the collection of one third to the king, and one third to the church, but a less punitive sum of 6s 8d to the Crown per sack, about 5 per cent of the value. In the 1980s the theory was advanced that it made reference to slavery, but most scholars disagree.

3

Mary Had a Little Lamb
 
 

Picture 2-78

The nursery rhyme was first published as an original poem by Sarah Josepha Hale on May 24, 1830, and was inspired by an actual incident. As a girl, Mary Sawyer (later Mrs. Mary Tyler) kept a pet lamb, which she took to school one day at the suggestion of her brother. A commotion naturally ensued. Mary recalled:

“Visiting school that morning was a young man by the name of John Roulstone, a nephew of the Reverend Lemuel Capen, who was then settled in Sterling. It was the custom then for students to prepare for college with ministers, and for this purpose Mr. Roulstone was studying with his uncle. The young man was very much pleased with the incident of the lamb; and the next day he rode across the fields on horseback to the little old schoolhouse and handed me a slip of paper which had written upon it the three original stanzas of the poem…”

2

London Bridge is Falling Down
 
 

London Bridge Is Falling Down

“London Bridge Is Falling Down is a well-known traditional nursery rhyme and singing game, which is found in different versions all over the world. One theory of origin is that the rhyme relates to supposed destruction of London Bridge by Olaf II of Norway in 1014 (or 1009). Another postulates that the rhyme refers to the practice of burying children alive in the foundations of the bridge – though there is no evidence to support this. The fair lady referred to could be Matilda of Scotland who was responsible for the building of a series of London bridges, or Eleanor of Provence who had custody of the bridge income from 1269 to 1281.

1

Ring a Ring o’ Roses
 
 

Ring-Ring

Ring a Ring o’ Roses first appeared in print in 1881 but it was being sung from at least the 1790s. Most people consider the nursery rhyme to be making reference to the Great Plague of London in 1665 but this view did not appear until after World War II. Furthermore, the symptoms don’t describe the plague particularly well, and the words upon which the plague interpretation is based don’t even exist in the earliest forms of the rhyme. The earliest form recorded is:

Ring around the rosy,
A pocket full of posies;
ashes, ashes
we all fall down!

Despite the fact that it is extremely unlikely to refer to the plague, the concept is so deeply set in the modern English speaker’s psyche that it is unlikely to fade in the future.

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