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scarcrow

Whilst the lilies blaze

In the summer rays

The butterflies dance

In their summer romance

The robin awaits

The fresh worms to escape

From the ground

They tease,until they are found

Where gardeners sow

Fresh veg to grow

Potatoes,leeks and marrow

The scarecrow stands so proud

Thankful for the sunshine now

He watches with an evil eye

When the birds reluctantly pass by

Roses parade along the fence

Flirting with the bees,

Soaking up their heavy scent

Capturing the moment

Of this summer scene

Gillian Sims

Send your poetry to gillianandthomas@yahoo.com

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Blackbird on a plantpot

If you’d love to see more wildlife in your garden, clever choices for your borders and herb patches can give nature a helping hand.

And by making space for the mini-beasts you can provide for the whole food chain, without shelling out for specialist supplies.

When you leave part of your garden untouched, with good access to other gardens or wild spaces, you are creating safe area for wildlife away from human influences.

An undisturbed pile of logs makes an excellent hideaway for an incredible number of insects which in turn can attract birds and mammals.

But if you prefer a more orderly garden, you can still provide additional food and shelter for all the small things – and some of the big ones too – with a good mix of plants.

  • Trees not only give birds somewhere to nest but can provide fruit for foxes, badgers and even deer
  • Hedgerows, such as holly, provide essential cover and corridors that join up green spaces for small mammals
  • A range of shrubs that flower at different times will improve the diversity of visitors to your garden
  • Longer grass is essential for egg-laying insects such as butterflies, so leave a bit of lawn untrimmed
  • Taller flowers will attract flying friends from bees to dragonflies
  • Night-scented plants such as buddleia and evening primrose are great for moths which in turn are a feast for bats
  • Wall climbers can provide links between gardens for pollinators
  • Make a calm haven in coastal gardens with trellis and evergreens to act as a windbreak
  • Don’t forget your water feature: ponds are essential for amphibians and offer a bath and beverage for birds
  • Choose your own compost over peat – the latter is a threatened habitat while compost heaps are a warm home to reptiles as well as a great source of nutrients for your garden

There is some debate between experts over whether native plant species are better for our wildlife and a study is currently underway at the Royal Horticultural Society‘s Wisley garden in Surrey to determine which bugs like best.

Helen Bostock is a RHS wildlife gardening specialist who runs the Plants for Bugs project and has researched the most frequently recommended plants to attract the birds, bees, butterflies and more.

Her top ten plants every wildlife gardener should consider for their patch are: sunflowers, foxgloves, thyme, lavender, honeysuckle, rowan, ice plant, firethorn, barberry and purple loosestrife.

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I MEANT TO DO MY WORK TODAY

I meant to do my work today…
But a brown bird sang in the apple tree.
And a butterfly flitted across the field,
And all the leaves were calling me.
And the wind went sighing over the land,
Tossing the grasses to and fro,
And a rainbow held out its shining hand…
So what could I do but laugh and go?

~By Richard LeGallienne~

TREES

Trees are the kindest things I know,
They do no harm, they simply grow.
And spread a shade for sleepy cows,
And gather birds among their boughs.

They give us fruit in leaves above,
And wood to make our houses of,
And leaves to burn on Halloween,
And in the Spring new buds of green.

They are first when the day’s begun
To touch the beams of morning sun,
They are the last to hold the light
When evening changes into night.

And when a moon floats on the sky
They hum a drowsy lullaby,
Of sleepy children long ago…
Trees are the kindest things I know.

~By Harry Behn~

FEEDING THE BIRDS…

To me, the garden is a doorway to other worlds;
one of them, of course, is the world of birds.
The garden is their dinner table,
bursting with bugs and worms and succulent berries.
~by Anne Raver~

***

As Autumn aproaches,
it’s time to set up a feeding station
for our feathered friends,
so we can enjoy their company in our garden,
over the winter months.
In the garden, their are plenty of plants,
rich in berries, enticing birds into the garden,
but they will need a little extra,
to see them through the months to come.

***

Here are some festive ideas…

String whole peanuts
and dried fruit together to create a garland.

Scoop out some orange halves,
make three holes around the rim for hanging
and then tie with string/ribbon.
Fill with suet, nuts or birdseed.

Find some pinecones,
and coat with peanut butter or suet,
then roll in birdseed.
Hang on your bird-table,
or tree with string/ribbon.

***

A really good idea,
is too keep a container with a lid
in the kitchen,
to put
bread crumbs/stale bread/crusts/crackers/rolls in,
and biscuits/cookies/cake and cereals,
also apple cores can go in too.

What a feast they will have 🙂

GARDEN PATH

Let’s stroll along a garden path
And just enjoy the day
No thoughts of worries fill our minds
We’ll just wander on our way.

Forget about life’s problems
You’ll see that they will keep
Just walk with me a little ways
Nature’s blessings we will reap.

Let’s find some joy in little things
We’ll talk of nothing much
Just wander down the garden path
Sweet flowers we shall touch.

We’ll find a spot to sit awhile
And watch the clouds float by
We’ll listen to the song of birds
And sigh a pleasant sigh.

When at last the day is over
And home now we must go
Take the memory along with you
For the days you’re feeling low.

~by Charlotte Anselmo~

A LITTLE POEM…

The kiss of the sun for pardon.
The song of the bird for mirth.
One is nearer God’s heart in a garden
Than anywhere else on earth.

~Author Unknown~

DO NOT STAND AT MY GRAVE AND WEEP

Do not stand at my grave and weep;
I am not there, I do not sleep.
I am a thousand winds that blow;
I am the diamond glints on snow.
I am the sunlight on ripened grain;
I am the gentle autumn’s rain.

When you awaken in the morning’s hush,
I am the swift uplifting rush;
of quiet birds in circled flight.
I am the soft star that shines at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry.
I am not there; I did not die.

~Author Unknown~

CHINESE PROVERBS…

Keep a green tree in your heart
and perhaps a singing bird will come.
~Chinese Proverb~

That the birds of worry and care
fly over your head,
this you cannot change,
but that they build nests in your hair,
this you can prevent.
~Chinese proverb~

A bird does not sing
because it has an answer;
it sings because it has a song.
~Chinese proverb~

MY MOTHER

One crisp, bright, moisty, morning,
When Spring was on the brink,
My memories started blooming,
I couldn’t help but think.

Of a woman I called Mother,
And what she’s meant to me,
Of long time that has passed,
Just what and who was she?

Did you ever see a butterfly,
Elusive and so free,
So elegant and beautiful,
A sight for all to see?

Did you ever see a sunset,
Spectacular and bright,
But fading, oh, so quickly,
Like a spurling, whirling kite?

Did you ever see the dewdrops,
Sparkling in the sun,
Just waiting to be gently touched,
But gone before it’s done?

Did you ever see a rainstorm,
Brewing in the sky,
Slowly rumbling and a tumbling,
Before your very eyes?

I know you’ve heard a songbird,
With it’s slow caressing tune,
That comforts and that soothes you,
As a warm beeze blows at noon.

All of these are memories,
Of a timid soul, I’ve known,
Who I can now appreciate,
Since I am up and grown!

~By Phyllis Cole~

 

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watering can

How school gardens help our children grow stronger As well as helping children lead happier, healthier lives today, the research showed gardening helped them acquire the essential skills they need to fulfil their potential in a rapidly-changing world and make a positive contribution to society as a whole. The 3 Rs of School Gardening Although the benefits of gardening as a teaching tool are many and varied, we’ve identified 3 core areas in which children’s lives are radically improved. They become: 1. Ready to learn 2. Resilient 3. Responsible Specifically it found that gardening in schools encourages children to: • Become stronger, more active learners capable of thinking independently and adapting their skills and knowledge to new challenges at school and in future; • Gain a more resilient, confident and responsible approach to life so they can achieve their goals and play a positive role in society; • Learn vital job skills such as presentation skills, communication and team work, and fuel their entrepreneurial spirit; • Embrace a healthier, more active lifestyle as an important tool for success at school and beyond; •

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1672586
Amazing winter animals around the world unite,
Although extremely clever they know not it’s Christmas night.
Each day the same magical chores, each morning cool and crisp,
Secretly they disappear into their own little world in a wisp.

Strolling through the forest collecting chestnuts in the glade,
I peer and spy a reindeer and squirrel inquisitively gaze,
Robins scurrying in the holly bush and weasels in the brook,
Our faithful wide eyed earthly friends, so sadly misunderstood.

Rainforests, blue oceans, snowy hills and sandy bays,
God’s great gift for all on Earth, not just the human race.
Indian tigers in their jungles, African elephants on their plains,
South American anacondas, all share the air God made.

The flicker of Christmas candles creates a homely scene,
Twinkling lights and warm log fires for some is just a dream.
Indelible Christmas memories, my heart’s feeling so divine,
But our love is the everlasting love of animals for all time.

DIANA DOONER

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garden

 
Hot temperatures in the summer are notorious for producing strong thunderstorms. These thunderstorms can contain torrential downpours, high winds, and even hail.

All of these ingredients can wreck a vegetable garden in minutes by causing plant damage, soil erosion, plant diseases, and flooding. It can be difficult, maybe even impossible to protect precious vegetables from the wrath of Mother Nature, but here are a few tips for what to do after a heavy thunderstorm.

Corn After Heavy Rain and Hail

    1. Survey any plant damage. Take a survey of any leaf or stem damage that may have occurred. If there is minimal damage to leaves, you may be able to just remove them. Keep an eye on plants that have received moderate or heavy damage over the next couple days , the plant might be able to recuperate. Try to stake up plants that are now leaning. If the main stem of a plant has snapped then more than likely it is a loss. You can try grafting the stem back together. There is no guarantee the plant will survive, but you can try to salvage it.

 

    1. Try to avoid walking right next to the plants while the soil is saturated. During this time plants, and root systems, are very vulnerable to damage from stepping on them. Walking near plants can also cause soil impaction, which can limit root growth. This is not a big concern if you have a well designed raised bed garden where you can reach each plant without stepping near them.

 

    1. Check for any exposed roots due to soil erosion. If you find exposed roots, cover them with soil or compost as soon as possible. Do not let the roots dry out – this could be catastrophic to the plant.
  • After a very heavy rain you may need to replenish nutrients. Having heavy water runoff can carry nutrients from the soil. Make sure to replenish these nutrients with fish emulsion or an organic all-purpose fertilizer.

 

  • During the storm (or soon after) look for areas that may be draining poorly. You do not want areas of long standing water in the vegetable garden. This can be very bad for plants, and could lead to root rot. If you find areas that drain poorly, create ways to get the water to drain away from the vegetable garden. You could implement dry creek beds (rock beds) or use plastic water drains to redirect water from the vegetable garden.

 

  • Eliminate possible slug or snail hiding places. Slugs and snails love damp places that have hiding areas. Remove any boards, stones, or other items that are laying around in or around the garden.

 

  • Keep an eye on emerging weeds. Weeds love to pop up soon after a storm. The sudden charge of moisture to the soil will encourage weeds to spring up almost overnight. Put down some type of mulch to prevent weeds and to help ease soil erosion.

 

  • Empty any containers that have collected water. Overturn any buckets, wheelbarrows,  or pot saucers that contain rainwater. These are breeding grounds for mosquitoes. If you have a rain barrel, you could dump the rainwater in there.

 

  • Keep an eye out for fungal or bacterial diseases. Damp, humid conditions are perfect for fungal and bacterial disease development. Diseases, such as powdery mildew, will spread very quickly in these conditions. Treat these diseases as soon as they are noticed. Waiting too long to act can mean serious trouble for your vegetable plants.

If you have more tips on taking care of your vegetable garden after a strong storm, please share them with us

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COBBBBBBB

 

The nature versus nurture debate is about the relative influence of an individual’s innate attributes as opposed to the experiences from the environment one is brought up in, in determining individual differences in physical and behavioral traits. The philosophy that humans acquire all or most of their behavioral traits from “nurture” is known as tabula rasa (“blank slate”).

In recent years, both types of factors have come to be recognized as playing interacting roles in development. So several modern psychologists consider the question naive and representing an outdated state of knowledge. The famous psychologist Donald Hebb is said to have once answered a journalist’s question of “which, nature or nurture, contributes more to personality?” by asking in response, “which contributes more to the area of a rectangle, its length or its width?”.

Comparison chart

MAKE YOUR COMMENT ABOUT THIS SUBJECT!       

 

Nature

Nurture

What is it? In the “nature vs nurture” debate, nature refers to an individual’s innate qualities (nativism). In the “nature vs nurture” debate, nurture refers to personal experiences (i.e. empiricism or behaviorism).
Example Nature is your genes. The physical and personality traits determined by your genes stay the same irrespective of where you were born and raised. Nurture refers to your childhood, or how you were brought up. Someone could be born with genes to give them a normal height, but be malnourished in childhood, resulting in stunted growth and a failure to develop as expected.
 

Factors

 

Biological and family factors Social and environmental factors

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Gardener next to robin

There’s plenty of jobs to be done in the garden before Christmas Day 

As the days lengthen, the cold strengthens” is a saying endorsed by many winters. In January, our gardens may well be frosted and frozen, but in these often beautiful and milder days that run up to Christmas, there are many windows of opportunity. Here is my Christmas gardening “Advent calendar” of 24 jobs that can make a real difference to your enjoyment of the garden next year.

December 1st Poppies will be having a field day in 2014, with the First World War centenary. Results will be far better if they’re sown before Christmas. Order quickly, as many councils are also buying vast quantities of Papaver rhoeas (field poppy, corn poppy, Flanders poppy). Try Emorsgate Seeds (Wildseed).

2nd Bulb suppliers offer big discounts now. Many bulbs are fine planted up to and even beyond Christmas. Tulips are brilliant stocking fillers (seeGee Tee). I have ordered 1,000 violet-blue Triteleia ‘Queen Fabiola’ for £25 to form strips of colour along my yew hedge base. The quickest way to plant large quantities of bulbs is to lift a flap of close-mown turf, plant seven or more per pit and push the flap back down. Protect crocus bulbs from squirrels with chicken wire on top (removed as they start to show).

3rd Planting my wallflowers. This gets later every year, but at least if you grow your own (sown in plugs in May/June and then transplanted into some spare ground and pinched out) you will be lifting big, bushy plants with mini root balls, so they cope well with a late move.

4th I’m still collecting seed, especially from my cleomes. Putting them in the fridge in a plastic bag for a couple of weeks helps germinating, then pop them into trays with a thin covering of vermiculite on the kitchen window sill.

5th A last-minute dash to clean up the greenhouse. The quickest way to remove pests and fungal spores is to use a sulphur candle (available from many garden centres), but you must take out any plants and leave it shut up for 12 hours.

6th Get all tender plants moved to snug places – porches, windowsills, garages. Invest in a roll of fleece and lots of mulch. Slightly iffy plants left outside such as agapanthus, dahlias, tulbaghias and Canna iridiflora will benefit from a big, thick duvet of mulch.

7th Move lemon verbena (Aloysia triphylla) inside. Add fresh leaves and honey to a green tea. It de-stresses, aids digestion and eases colic. A potted plant would be the ideal present.

8th Get bare-root hedges, trees and shrubs in before Christmas if possible or at least order them.

9th Put spiral plastic tree guards on all young, newly planted trees to protect against rabbit damage.

10th Check that all new plants are labelled. The Touch Labelling Co (01572 574910) labels last more than 20 years.

11th Zap any lingering bindweed or ground elder with glyphosate. It will still be effective now (though slower to work) and will make life easier next spring.

12th Keep on picking and storing apples and pears.

13th Leave some apples, chopped in half, for birds; they are great for fieldfares, redwings and thrushes. Build an apple tower on a cane and watch them enjoy!

14th Put water out for birds too; add a ping-pong ball, which helps slow the freezing.

15th Make a fat ball for them too, but don’t use turkey fat as it does not set hard, and so gets smeared on beaks and, worse still, feathers.

16th Leaf sweeping using the mower set high is quick, and speeds breakdown. Avoid if frost is on its way.

17th You may not get around to cleaning your tools, but do get the mower blades sharpened and, ideally, keep a spare pair.

18th Climbing roses need pruning and tying back to stop them waving around.

19th Mulching roses helps them earn their keep; it also keeps down the spread of black spot, especially if you remove all infected leaves too.

20th Bring in the furniture if necessary, let it dry and give a good clean down with a stiff brush to remove any dirt. Then apply liberal coats of teak oil before brushing off excess after the oil has had a chance to soak in.

21st Pot up any promising-looking cuttings or young plants, as presents. Even small-rooted pelargonium cuttings are extremely welcome to gardening friends.

22nd Remove mummified fruit from fruit trees, to stop disease spreading.

23rd Start winding down. Get out a great seed catalogue, such as that from heirloomtoms.org. Order dark purple-black ‘Indigo Rose’ tomatoes (very high in anthocyanins and tasty), some ‘Dragon’s Egg’ cucumbers – which taste like melons but are far easier to grow – and/or some ‘Red Hmong’ cucumbers just 5-6in long in a dusky orange but with a bewitching and exquisite flavour. Try Rainbow Beet from Thompson and Morgan, a mix of scarlet, gold, candy-striped and white beetroot, which I found easy, delicious and attractive.

24th Set out some home-made chilli vodka and a mince pie for your favourite Father Christmas, and if you both get done in time you can knock it back together!

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flys

On a Lilly pad a frog sat alone
He jumped in the water, a splash he’d known
Frog swam and swam until he met his pal
On another Lilly pad sat crazy Hal

Hal had ideas the frog wasn’t sure
His plans were not always completely pure
Frog followed Hal thru the grassy quagmire
They’d gone fairly far, Frog began to tire

It started to sprinkle very large drops
The two hid in the marsh with a few hops
Hal whispered his plan in Frogs little ear
To scare Miss Lady it became very clear

Miss Lady was such a beautiful gal
She really liked Frog but not ornery Hal
She…always waiting for some sneaky prank
Tired of their shenanigans to be quite frank

Miss Lady was going to turn the table
Prank those two, she was perfectly able
She set up her plan in the mossy bog
When here came that Hal, followed by Frog

Miss Lady was on her favorite pad
She couldn’t help but be a little mad
Miss Lady cried out, she needed a hand
She led them just inches from quicksand

This little prank could have been quite a mess
Miss Lady scared them she had to confess
They quickly backed up in total surprise
The three agreed to end pranks and eat some flies
Bernadette Rivera 
USA

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Weather Poems

Learn about weather

Here is a fun tongue twister to share with your children. See how fast they can read it without screwing up! You may need to go over the vocabulary word “weather” with them before hand.

Whether the weather be fine,
Or whether the weather be not,
Whether the weather be cold,
Or whether the weather be hot,
We’ll weather the weather
Whatever the weather
Whether we like it or not.


I like to watch the way the wind
can spin a weather vane.
I like to wear my big blue boots
to splash with in the rain.
I like to ride my bright red sled
on cold snowy days.
I like to feel the sun’s warm rays
when I wade in the ocean waves.
Wind, rain, snow, and sun
Every kind of weather
is wonderful and funnie

Weather Poem

Weather Poem

Weather is hot,
Weather is cold,
Weather is changing
As the weeks unfold.

Skies are cloudy,
Skies are fair,
Skies are changing
In the air.

It is raining,
It is snowing,
It is windy
With breezes blowing.

Days are foggy,
Days are clear,
Weather is changing
Throughout the year!

by Meish Goldish

What Makes Weather Poem

What Makes Weather?

What makes weather?
Do you know?
What makes rain,
and sleet,
and snow?

What makes summer warm and breezy?
What makes winter cold and sneezy?
What makes autumn crisp and keen?
What makes spring so warm and green?

I know, I know
what makes weather!
Lots of things that work together:
Wind and water,
earth’s rotation,
bring the seasons
to each nation.
So now we all know
what makes weather-
lots of things that
work together!


Weather Poem For Kids

Rain rain
falls on the street,
mud in puddles
cleaning my feet.

Thunder thunder
rumble and roar,
close the windows
and lock the door.

Clouds clouds
black and gray,
heavy with water
to drop all day.

Sun sun
is breaking through,
clouds are moving,
the rain stops too.

Rainbow rainbow
across the sky,
see-through colours
to tickle my eyes.

by James Hörner

Wonderful Weather Poem

Snowflakes

Icy, cold crystals
Falling, falling from the sky
Landing on my tongue

White, lacy wonders
Resting gently on my face
Melting on my skin

Running, scampering
Chasing, catching, shivering
Time for hot cocoa

Rain Weather Poem

Perfect for a rainy school day!

Dot a dot dot dot a dot dot
Spotting the windowpane.
Spack a spack speck flick a flack fleck
Freckling the windowpane.
A spatter a scatter a wet cat a clatter
A splatter a rumble outside.
Umbrella umbrella umbrella umbrella
Bumbershoot barrel of rain.
Slosh a galosh slosh a galosh
Slither and slather and glide
A puddle a jump a puddle a jump
A puddle a jump puddle splosh
A juddle a pump a luddle a dump a
Puddmuddle jump in and slide!

by Eve Merriam

Weather Songs

Sing together about the weather!

Weather Helper Song (To the tune of “Oh My Darlin”)

Weather Helper, Weather Helper
What’s the weather outside?
Go and look out the window,
Tell us what you see outside.
What’s the weather?
What’s the weather?
What’s the weather tell everyone.
Is it windy? Is it cloudy? Is there rain? or is there sun?

Weather Song (to the tune of “Bingo”)

There was a time when it was hot
And sunny was the weather.
Sun, sun, all around,
Sun, sun, all around,
Sun, sun, all around,
And sunny was the weather.

replace with appropriate weather words
eg:
There was a time with it was wet
And rainy was the weather….

(to the tune of “Bingo”)

Today the sun is in the sky,
And sunny is the weather.
S-U-N-N-Y, S-U-N-N-Y, S-U-N-N-Y
And sunny is the weather.

Other verses:
Today the rain falls from the sky… R-A-I-N-Y
Today the clouds are in the sky… C-L-OUD-Y
Today the fog hangs in the sky… F-O-G-G-Y
Today the snow falls from the sky… S-N-O-W-Y
Today we have to wear a coat.. C-O-L-D

Weather Song (to the tune of “Oh My Darling”)

What’s the weather?
What’s the weather?
What’s the weather, everyone?
Is it windy?
Is it cloudy?
Is there rain?
Or is there sun?

Whether the weather be mild or whether the weather be not,
Whether the weather be cold or whether the weather be hot,
We’ll weather the weather whatever the weather,
Whether we like it or not.

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Emily-Bronte_4

 
Fall, leaves, fall; die, flowers, away;
Lengthen night and shorten day;
Every leaf speaks bliss to me
Fluttering from the autumn tree.
I shall smile when wreaths of snow
Blossom where the rose should grow;
I shall sing when night’s decay
Ushers in a drearier day
Emily Bronte

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