Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for April 6th, 2014

 mountain

At the Store

1. Shop smart. Plan meals, use grocery lists, and avoid impulse buys. This way, you’re less likely to buy things you don’t need and that you’re unlikely to actually consume. Buy items only when you have a plan for using them, and wait until perishables are all used up before buying more. Check out these apps for extra-easy meal planning.

2. Buy exactly what you need. For example, if a recipe calls for two carrots, don’t buy a whole bag. Instead, buy loose produce so you can purchase the exact number you’ll use. Likewise, try buying grains, nuts, and spices from bulk bins so you can measure out exactly what you need and don’t over-buy (Just note that there’s a difference between buying in bulk and buying from bulk bins; the first one can actually create more waste if we buy more than we can realistically use). Bonus: This tip will save some cash, to boot.

3. Be realistic. If you live alone, you won’t need the same number of apples as a family of four (unless you really like apples). If you rarely cook, don’t stock up on goods that have to be cooked in order to be consumed (such as baking supplies or dried grains and beans).

4. Buy funny-looking produce. Many fruits and vegetables are thrown away because their size, shape, or colors don’t quite match what we think these items “should” look like. But for the most part these items are perfectly good to eat, and buying them at a farmer’s market or the grocery store helps use up food that might otherwise be tossed.

5. Have a Plan B. Let’s say you buy Camembert to make a fancy dish for that fancy dinner party — and then the dinner party is canceled. Don’t toss the cheese! Instead, come up with a backup recipe and use it in a different dish (or just eat it plain, because c’mon — it’s cheese).

At Home

6. Practice FIFO. It stands for First In, First Out. When unpacking groceries, move older products to the front of the fridge/freezer/pantry and put new products in the back. This way, you’re more likely to use up the older stuff before it expires.

7. Monitor what you throw away. Designate a week in which you write down everything you throw out on a regular basis. Tossing half a loaf of bread each week? Maybe it’s time to start freezing half that loaf the moment you buy it so it doesn’t go stale before you’re able to eat it.

8. Take stock. Note upcoming expiration dates on foods you already have at home, and plan meals around the products that are closest to their expiration. On a similar note, keep a list of what’s in the freezer and when each item was frozen. Place this on the freezer door for easy reference and use items before they pass their prime.

9. Designate one dinner each week as a “use-it-up” meal. Instead of cooking a new meal, look around in the cupboards and fridge for leftovers and other food that might otherwise get overlooked.

10. Eat leftovers! Brown-bag them for work or school for a free packed lunch. If you don’t want to eat leftovers the day after they’re cooked, freeze and save them for later (just remember to note when you froze them so you can use them up in a timely fashion).

11. Use it all. When cooking, use every piece of whatever food you’re cooking with, whenever possible. For example, leave the skin on cucumbers and potatoes, sauté broccoli stems along with the florets (they taste good too; we promise!), and so on. Bonus: Skins and stems often have provide additional nutrients for our bodies.

12. Store better. If you regularly throw away stale chips/cereal/crackers/etc., trystoring them in airtight containers — this should help them keep longer (or, of course, just buy fewer of these products).

13. Repurpose leftovers scraps. Use vegetable and meat scraps in homemade stocks, and use citrus fruit rinds and zest to add flavor to other meals. Want more ideas? Check out these resources for using up food scraps.

14. Check the fridge. Make sure it’s functioning at maximum efficiency. Look for tight seals, proper temperature, etc. — this will ensure that the fridge keeps food fresh as long as possible.

15. Preserve produce. Produce doesn’t have to be tossed just because it’s reaching the end of its peak. Soft fruit can be used in smoothies; wilting vegetables can be used in soups, etc. And both wilting fruits and veggies can be turned into delicious, nutritious juice.

16. Donate what you won’t use. Never going to eat that can of beans? Donate it to a food kitchen before it expires so it can be consumed by someone who needs it. Check out this resource to locate a food bank near you.

17. Donate the gross stuff, too! Many farmers happily accept food scraps for feeding pigs or adding to a compost heap. To find farms near you, check out one of these resources.

18. Store food properly in the fridge. Learn how and where to store specific products in the fridge, and they’re likely to keep longer (hint: they don’t call it the “produce drawer” for nothin’!).

19. Store things properly in the freezer. Same as above: How and where westore products in the freezer makes a difference in how long they’ll last.

20. Can it. Got more fruit than you know what to do with? Try canning it so it’ll last for months to come. (Plus, who doesn’t love eating “fresh” peaches in winter?)

21. Pickle it. Both fruits and vegetables can be preserved through an easy pickling process.

22. Understand expiration dates. Turns out those expiration dates don’t always have to do with food safety; rather, they’re usually manufacturers’ suggestions for peak quality. If stored properly, most foods (even meat) stay fresh several days past the “use-by” date. If a food looks, smells, and tastes okay, it should be fine. If any of these elements are off, then it’s time to toss it.

23. Compost! Hate potato skins? Don’t feel like turning wilted vegetables into soup stock? No worries; food scraps still don’t need to be tossed. Just start a compost pile in the backyard or even under the sink, and convert food waste into a useful resource.

During Mealtime

24. Check in with your belly. Here it is, ladies and gentlemen: The solution to the “clean your plate!” issue. Simply take a moment to ask your body what it wants to eat, and how much — and then serve yourself that. Or simply start with less food on your plate. If you want more, you can always go back for it — but this way you won’t find out that you’re full and still have a heap of food in front of you. In fact, one study found that reducing portion sizes is an easy way to reduce food waste [1].

25. Split the dish. If eating out, split a dish with a friend so you don’t waste half of the giant portion sizes found at many restaurants.

26. Take home leftovers. Even if you’re not into splitting meals, those portion sizes don’t have to be wasted. Just ask to take leftovers home (bonus eco points if you bring your own reusable container!), and you’ve got yourself a free lunch the next day.

27. Share. Made a quadruple recipe of a casserole you ended up disliking? Gift it to friends, family, or neighbors — they’re likely to be grateful for the saved money and time.

28. Go trayless. When eating in a cafeteria, skip the tray. Doing so is associated with a reduction in food waste, possibly because it’s harder for people to carry more food than they can actually eat.

29. Educate other people. Sure, nobody likes a Debbie Downer at the dinner table. But turns out simply being aware of the issue of food waste can help make people more attentive to wasting less [2].

How do you save on your weekly food bill?  Send your tips. Share with us. Make a comment.

Read Full Post »

Read Full Post »

fruits-of-labor1

Hundreds and thousands have toiled under the scorching sun of summer, 
to grow the food which so comfortably we eat.

think of food as the fruit of labor of thousands of hours, 
rather than just rice and wheat.

millions die due to lack of food, so is their fate, 
but we are lucky to have every time enough in our plate.

we may never go to the fields to produce the food, 
but my friend ‘food saved is food produced’.

so lets take a vow today to put in our plate only that much which we can eat, 
so that even a single single grain may not go waste. 

Sunny Mittal

Read Full Post »

Tabulampot

Tabulampot anggur, Jual tabulampot, Buat tabulampot, tabulampot durian montong, Tabulampot durian bawor, tabulampot durian berbuah, menanam di dalam drum, tabulampot durian merah, pohon durian pendek, cara menanam durian musang king, pohon durian bonsai, tabulampot jambu air, cara membuat tabulampot cepat berbuah, Cara menanam tabulampot, media tabulampot, tabulampot mangga, tabulampot jaboticaba, tabulampot kesemek, tabulampot lada perdu, tabulampot mamey sapote, tabulampot Cerry, tabulampot jambu kristal, tabulampot lengkeng new kristal, tabulampot lengkeng, tabulampot alpukat, tabulampot duwet, tabulampot tin, tabulampot sawo, tabulampot murah, tabulampot Salaman, tabulampot Magelang, tabulampot trubus

Buzz In The Snow

Cogitare est Vivare...

seenu625

love nature, and all things creative

Barkha Sharma Konfar

You don’t start out writing good stuff. You start out writing crap and thinking it’s good stuff, and then gradually you get better at it. That’s why I say one of the most valuable traits is persistence.” ― Octavia E. Butler

Sallyporte

Destinations & Obsessions blog

Onegoal24

You are sure to win

Ashley O'Melia, Author

A garden of wild thoughts in straight little rows

ipekseyhanpoyrazkarayel

Asla İdeallerinden Vazgeçme Asla! Never Give Up Your İdeals Never!

The Sports Archives Blog

The Sports and Fitness Media Center

Orlando Espinosa

Keep it Simple!

Grumpa Joe's Place

My Flag Flies Everyday

Dr Ken Baker

Pastor & Writer

Public Secrets

Purveyors of fine twisted propaganda since 2006!

rodocarda

Racconti, Fotografie, Opinioni

%d bloggers like this: