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Archive for the ‘Tips for kids’ Category

girl-rib

Grilling is the quintessential summertime family activity. Just mentioning a BBQ conjures up visions of grassy parks, coolers with sodas, and a fiery range covered with delicious cooked meats and veggies.

It’s important to be aware of the inherent risks that come with barbequing, especially when children are involved.

Children are inherently interested in cooking and food. The process is mysterious to them, so take the opportunity to educate them about safe barbequing. Energetic and growing youngsters are inclined to be eager to eat aromatic delicacies grilling on the BBQ.

Kids are the most vulnerable to being injured by a barbeque. Not all accidents can be avoided, but this guide will provide suggestions to keep your little ones safe so accidents are at least less likely. You’ll also get some fun grilling ideas that you can do with your children.

Give Them a Grill Tutorial

family-bbq

Embrace children’s natural curiosity about cooking! While still turned off, show them the BBQ and explain how it works. A short tutorial will go a long way in curbing curiosity once the actual cooking has begun. Show them:

  • Stop Drop and Roll: Show kids the standard procedure if their clothing was to catch on fire. Stopping, dropping to the ground, and rolling is the tried and true technique, and could save their life one day should fire get out of control.
  • Heating: Demonstrate how to turn on a gas barbeque and how to adjust the flame. Let kids help arrange charcoal briquettes in a charcoal BBQ, like building with blocks.
  • Food Prep: Food must undergo a fair amount of prep before it can be grilled away on the barbeque. Show your children the steps, marinating meat, skewering kabobs, wrapping potatoes or corn in aluminum foil. Showing children these steps involves them in barbequing and enhances their knowledge about cooking.

 

Avoiding Sharp Edges

Surprisingly, a large portion of barbeque related injuries come from being cut or scratched by the BBQ itself. Tissue wounds are the second most common injury for children, after burns. Barbeques are bulky machines mostly made of metal. Also, spatulas, metal brushes, skewers, tongs, and other barbequing tools are sharp and can cause scrapes. Be aware of jagged edges, pointy protrusions, and anything that a child-size person could bump their head on. It might even be worth it to “baby-proof” any part of the BBQ grill that seems particularly sharp with a piece of masking tape. Place metal grilling tools out of reach, preferably on a solid surface.

Safety Zone with Chalk

colored-chalk

To be completely safe, kids shouldn’t be anywhere near the barbeque once it’s turned on. Beforehand, why not have your kids draw a border on the pavement with chalk around the BBQ area? They can draw in a safety zone, which no one should enter while the adults are grilling. Making it into a creative game will make the experience fun!

Fun Kid Friendly Foods

Think of barbequing as a way to expand your children’s culinary horizons and enhance their palette. Instilling kids with a sense that they can make tasty, healthy food at home will go a long way for their health. Those who prepare their own foods avoid the pitfalls of fast-food and takeout: excess fat and calories, low nutritional value, and expensive prices.

grilled-kabobs

Some BBQ grilling ideas ideal for kids:

  • Stoplight Shish-kabobs: After soaking wooden skewers in water, layer green, red, and yellow colored veggie pieces. Suggested vegetables: Tomatoes, bell peppers for red; Squash, pineapple, or bell peppers for yellow; Zucchini, broccoli, asparagus, or bell peppers for green.
  • Pineapple Rings: Grilling fruit enhances the flavor and caramelizes its natural sugars. Have your kids use a small round cookie cutter to make rings in the center of sliced pineapple. Brush with a little sugar water and they’re good to go on the grill.
  • Sliders: Smaller versions of classic hamburgers are perfect for pint-sized appetites. Small slider patties are easy for little hands to form and they cook through quickly.

 

 

Safety & Maintenance Tips for Grilling at Home

Placement is Key

BBQ on a grassy hillsideBBQ grills must be used on heatproof flooring, at least 10 feet away from buildings or anything flammable. Barbequing should never be done inside, not even in an opened garage or tent. It is dangerous to use grills on patios, awnings, or balconies because of their proximity to buildings. It’s also important to make sure that thebarbeque is set up in a stable location, so it won’t fall over.

Ventilation

Leaving enough room for a cross-breeze keeps smoke from building up into a hazardous carbon monoxide miasma. Leave the grill in an area that has plenty of open space for the smoke to dissipate.

Checklist

Thoroughly examine the grill before barbequing for any cracks, holes, or damage. Be sure all the pieces of the barbeque grill fit together properly.

Cleanliness

Be sure that your BBQ grill is fully clean before and after cooking. Any leftover ash, charcoal, or grill residue needs to be brushed away and discarded. If your barbeque model comes with a drip pan, it should be emptied. A grill pad or splatter mat placed under the grill can catch any mess that the drip pan misses. This is important because build-up on the grate can cause fires.

Follow Instructions

It’s important to read the manual and instructions provided by the manufacturer before beginning your grilling odyssey. Even though it’s a drag, bear in mind that thousands of people are injured every year as a result of BBQ accidents. Also, read the fine print because misusing your barbeque can void any owner’s warranty you might have purchased.

Children

Boy giving thumbs up because he's safe around barbeques!Be especially aware of children when barbequing since they are the most likely to be injured from a grill. Even if you don’t have kids yourself, there’s a good chance that you might use your BBQ grill when other’s little tykes are around. If you have kids, it’s a good idea to give them a tutorial of the grill so they understand what makes it dangerous. Establish a “safety zone” and caution all children to stay away from the barbeque.

 

 

 

 

Obey the Heat

A barbeque can remain hot up to an hour after being turned off. You should never attempt to move or lift your grill while it’s on or still cooling.

Protect Yourself

Barbeques get extremely hot! Guard yourself from the heat using heavy duty gloves, long cooking utensils, and snug clothing. Clothing that hangs can catch fire easily, so avoid billowy sleeves, hanging apron strings, and long shirttails.

Fire SafetyFlames!

It’s not a bad idea to keep a fire extinguisher, garden hose, or at least 16 quarts of water handy, in case of flare-ups or accidents. In the event of a fire:

  • Propane BBQ: Turn off the burners, and shut off the tank valve if you can reach it safely.
  • Electric BBQ: Unplug or turn off electricity. 
  • Charcoal BBQ: Close lid over the grill
  • Grease Fires: Use a fire extinguisher to damper flames. Never extinguish using water because this will cause fiery flare ups.

Alcohol Awareness

Don’t drink and grill! Seriously, alcohol and BBQs can be a deadly combination. Besides impairing the grillmaster’s motor skills and synapses, plus alcohol is extremely flammable!

For the Gas Barbeque…

  • Propane Tanks: Inspect the cylinder of the tank for visible dents, leaks, or rust. If you see any damage, you should replace it.
  • Gas Pressure: Be aware of the temperature wherever the propane tank is stored, transported, and used. Keeping the propane container in a warm area increases the pressure of the gas and could cause an explosion.
  • Recycle: Do not throw away your propane tank in the trash; municipal and private programs are available for recycling. For disposable propane tanks, use all of the gas before tossing.

For the Charcoal Barbeque…

  • Lighter Fluid: Only use lighter fluid on unlit charcoal briquettes, not on coals that have already been lit. Never pour fluid directly onto an open flame, the fluid path could ignite the entire container! 
  • Charcoal: Heated coal pieces get extremely hot, never try to handle coals or ashes. After BBQing, place the ashes in a metal container with a lid, and mix them with water. This mixture should sit for several days before being disposed of in accordance with state regulations.

For the Electric Barbeque…

  • Electric Requirements: All extension cords and wall sockets must be able to handle the amperage of the electric grill. Otherwise the circuit board can become overwhelmed and start an electric fire.
  • Combustible Materials: Anything flammable should be kept at least 10 feet away from the grill when it’s in use.

Keep safe

 

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kids_on_log

With summer fast approacing, and seemingly endless days ahead, many parents fear the dreaded words from their children: “I’m bored!” Here are 20 activities to help keep boredom at bay:1) Fingerpaint with shaving cream on colored construction paper.2) Decorate a clay pot and plant a flower, herb, or tomato plant. Nurture it and watch it grow.

3) Draw a picture and mail it to Grandma and Grandpa. Or have them mail themselves a letter and see how long it takes to get back to them.

4) Decorate rocks with tempera paint. Add eyes to make them into insects or animals, or start a rock garden by filling a decorated shoe box with soil and placing the rocks in it.

5) Play with a magnet. Learn what it will and will not pick up. Attach it to string and tie it to a stick. Go fishing for paperclips.

6) Spray paint 2 liter bottles and use them as bowling pins.

7) Make a bird feeder by rolling a pinecone in peanut butter, then in bird seed. Hang it from a tree with string.

8) Have your kids design their own placemats. Help them cover their art work with clear contact paper.

9) Hide an object in a room and have your kids hunt for it. Tell them if they are “hot” when they get close to it or “cold” if they move away from it.

10) Have your kids help you wash the car. Spray them when they are not looking, and be prepared for a water fight. Have fun and plan to get really wet!

11) Make macaroni jewelry. You can color the macaroni by mixing one tablespoon food coloring with two tablespoons rubbing alcohol and stirring in the dry noodles. Make several colors.

12) Put a sheet over a table to create a tent and have a picnic lunch inside.

13) Read and act out one of your child’s favorite stories.

14) Go on a nature walk and study birds, leaves, and wild flowers. Try to identify them. Make a notebook of everything you learned about.

15) Use craft paints to decorate an old t-shirt.

16) Soak a cut celery stalk in a jar or glass of water tinted with food coloring. Watch what happens to it the next day.

17) Have a Hula Hoop contest.

18) Make a cake and let your children help you decorate it with colored frosting and candies.

19) Have a sock war. Designate an area free of breakables, set boundaries, and divide into two teams. Start firing!

20) Start a “summer journal”. Help your kids write about the things you did each day and let them illustrate it. Keep these to look back on as they get older.

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dentis

Both adults and children can develop anxiety about going to the dentist. To prevent and alleviate these fears, it is important to teach correct dental hygiene to your child from a young age. Encouraging daily brushing and flossing will most likely mean only cleanings and checkups without major surgery at dental appointments. Set an example for your child and let her brush and floss with you. Allow her to go with you for your dental appointments. If you have a fear of the dentist, avoid letting these emotions show.

Instructions

    1. 1

      Sit with your child and discuss why he is scared of the dentist. Ask him what he is most uncomfortable with and try to explain the process as best you can. Remain understanding and patient. Your child might be afraid of something that might seem trivial to you, but show sympathy when discussing his fears.

    2. 2

      Practice a trip to the dentist. Designate an area in your home and set it up with your child’s role-playing toys. Use a play dentist kit and a favourite stuffed animal or doll. Explain the process as you re-enact the dentist’s role. Once your child feels comfortable, allow him to take a turn and practice on a pretend patient.

  1. 3

    Purchase books or games about children visiting the dentist. Read stories about visiting the dentist and what dentist do for their patients. Select stories that address common fears.

  2. 4

    Schedule a visit to the dentist without a cleaning. Allow your child to look around the office and meet the receptionists and the dentist. If your child seems bothered or upset by the people there, consider switching dentists.

  3. 5

    Allow your child to accompany you to your appointment. If you have dentist fears, do not let your child pick up on them. Suppress any anxiety to avoid scaring your child. Let your child see the process firsthand so she can become more familiar and comfortable with the procedure. Schedule your appointment immediately before his so he can jump into the chair himself with the process still fresh in his mind.

  4. 6

    Schedule an appointment in the morning. Your child is more likely to be cooperative after a good night’s sleep. Take your child to a paediatric dentist, since these dentists typically have more training when treating young children. Paediatric dentists’ offices also have child-friendly decorations, brightly coloured walls and fun decor for your child to look at.

  5. 7

    Bring a favourite toy or stuffed animal. A security item will help your child to feel safe and comforted if she becomes scared. Allow your child to sit in your lap for the first time. This will also help your child to feel calm and safe during the appointment.

  6. 8

    Schedule routine checkups. Get your child used to going to the dentist frequently so that he knows it is a routine.

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playing on beach

1. Never swim alone. No never. Always have a buddy. 
2. Use sunscreen. I know, it is gooey, but a sunburn hurts. 
3. Stay where an adult can see you. No excuses. 
4. Always swim where there is a lifeguard on duty, or an adult supervising. 
5. Follow any rules posted at the pool or beach. Rules are to keep you safe. 
6. Follow mom and dad’s rules if you have a pool in your backyard. 
7. Do not swim with gum or candy in your mouth. You could choke. 
8. Do not go in water over your head unless you know how to swim. 
9. Take rest periods out of the water for 15 minutes every hour so you don’t get overtired. 
10. Drink plenty of cool fresh water while out in the summer heat. Also enjoy fresh fruit or snacks throughout the day for energy.

These tips are brief, but you get the idea why mom or dad continues to remind you of most of them every time you want to swim. Now you have the simple reasons behind the rules. Things like choking, blisters from the sun, dangerous to swim alone or in deep water… you get the idea.

Follow these simple rules when swimming at the pool or beach. Your parents will be happy knowing you are being safe. And you will enjoy being cool while having safe summer fun. When you are responsible with out being scolded or yelled at, both you and your parents will enjoy the summer. So remembering the rules and understanding the importance of safety in the water is a win- win situation for both you and your parents. Keep Cool.

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Hay fever doesn’t usually affect children until they’re about seven, and older children and teenagers are more susceptible to the allergy than adults.

According to Pierre Dugué, consultant allergist at Guy’s Hospital in London, if you think your child may have hay fever, make an appointment with your GP to get a diagnosis.

“It’s important to know if it’s hay fever, as it could be a non-pollen allergy such as dust mite or pet fur,” says Dugué.

Dugué says hay fever has clear seasonal symptoms, which occur every year at the same time. “The strict diagnosis of hay fever is allergy to grass pollen. But your child could also be allergic to tree pollen, which usually comes at the end of spring, before grass pollen is produced.

“Allergy to tree pollen usually means allergy to birch, hazel or elder trees, which are in the same family.”

Signs of hay fever in children

Look out for symptoms from March to October.

Sometimes hay fever can be confused with a virus. The way to tell the difference is by how long the symptoms last. If it’s a virus, they should only last for a week or two. Viruses rarely last for weeks and weeks. If your child has a constant runny nose and is sneezing every day for part of the year but not in the winter, it’s a sign that they may be allergic to something. 

Diagnosing hay fever

It’s important that hay fever is diagnosed so it can be treated and your child can take steps to avoid it. If your child only has symptoms in July and August on a very sunny day, it’s almost certainly hay fever.

In this case, you don’t really need a formal diagnosis. But if your child has symptoms all year round and you’re not sure if it’s hay fever, go to your GP for a diagnosis.

Treating hay fever symptoms

If your child doesn’t like taking tablets, antihistamines are also available as a liquid. Other treatments include steroid nasal sprays.

John Collard from Allergy UK says that antihistamines generally have a good safety record. “That’s why they’re available over the counter. People with hay fever should take them regularly, not just on the days when they feel bad. If you take them throughout the hay fever season, they work much better.”

Preventing hay fever symptoms

Pollen is released in the early morning. As the air warms up, the pollen is carried up above our heads. As evening comes and the air cools, pollen comes back down. So symptoms are usually worse first thing in the morning and early evening, particularly on days that have been warm and sunny. To reduce your child’s exposure to pollens: 

  • Keep windows closed at night so pollen doesn’t enter the house.
  • Buy your child a pair of wraparound sunglasses to stop pollen entering their eyes.
  • Smear petroleum jelly around the inside of your child’s nose to trap pollen and stop it being inhaled.
  • Wash your child’s hair, face and hands when they come back indoors and change their clothes.
  • Don’t let them play in fields or large areas of grassland. 
  • Use air filters to try to reduce pollen that’s floating around the house.
  • Keep the car windows shut when driving.

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sunshine

  • Set good habits for the future Teaching children safe sun habits while they are young sets a good pattern for later life.
  • Remember you can burn in the UK The Great British sun is quite capable of burning your child! Take extra care at home as well as abroad.
  • Use shade Keep babies in complete shade: under trees, umbrellas, canopies or indoors. Provide shade for prams and buggies, if possible.
  • Cover them up When outdoors, protect a baby’s skin with loose-fitting clothes, and a wide-brimmed hat that shades their face, neck and ears.
  • Wear sunglasses Buy good quality, wraparound sunglasses for children, as soon as they can wear them. Sunglasses don’t have to be expensive brands.
  • Find hats they like Encourage children to wear hats with brims, especially if they are not wearing sunglasses. The wider the brim, the more skin will be shaded from the sun.
  • Use sunscreen wisely Use at least a factor 15 sunscreen and choose a “broad-spectrum” brand that protects against UVA rays – the more stars the better. Apply to areas that cannot be protected by clothing, such as the face, ears, feet and backs of hands. Choose sunscreens that are formulated for children and babies’ skin. These products are less likely to contain alcohol or fragrances that might irritate the skin and cause allergic reactions.
  • Apply sunscreen generously and regularly. Put some on before children go outdoors. Sunscreen can easily be washed, rubbed or sweated off – so reapply often throughout the day.
  • Don’t forget school times Remember play times and lunch breaks on summer school daystoo. Give children a hat to wear and, if they can’t apply sunscreen at school, cover their exposed skin before they go.

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  • The Dog Ate My Homework

    dog eats homework

     

    The dog ate my homework
    just like it was kibble.
    He started up slow
    with a cute little nibble
    and then scarfed it down
    with a burp and a snort.
    How was he to know
    that my special report
    was due here this morning
    precisely at 8:00.
    So now it is eaten.
    I’m sorry it’s late.
    But what can you do
    when your dog needs a snack
    and your stapled report
    comes under attack?
    I told him to stop
    but he just wouldn’t mind.
    When my dog is hungry,
    he’s not very kind.
    I’ll bring it tomorrow,
    and you’ll see it then.
    So long as my dog
    isn’t hungry again.

    by Denise Rodgers

     

    Copyright© Denise Rodgers 

    All Rights Reserved

    Art by Julie Martin

    The second funny school poem in this set tells the same story… from the dog’s point of view!

     

    Yes, I Ate His Homework

    dog ate homework

     

    Yes, I ate his homework.
    You think I’m a liar!
    So kind of you, teacher,
    to go and inquire.
    It’s just that when hungry,
    despite what you think,
    there’s nothing more tasty
    than paper and ink,
    unless it’s some slippers
    or brand-new soft shoes,
    or maybe a sheet
    of some basted raw chews.
    I ate all the homework
    and part of the couch.
    There’s so much to eat
    and I’m hardly a slouch.
    So that is my story.
    I’ll swear that it’s true.
    Excuse me for now,
    I have text books to chew.

    by Denise Rodgers

     

    Copyright© Denise Rodgers 

    All Rights Reserved

    Art by Julie Martin

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AWT018 gbcs david griffen 241 (h)

  • 20mins to prepare and 15 mins to cook
  • 15

GBClogo recipe

Andy Water’s Coconut cookie crumble is an ideal recipe if kids are happy to get their hands all gooey.

Preheat the oven to gas 4, 180°C, fan 160°C

Line a baking tray with baking parchment – see if the kids can help laying this down.

In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, sugar, coconut and oats, blending well – messy, floury kids’ hands should be the sign of a job well done. Just make sure their hands are washed before getting stuck into the mix.

In a small pan, melt the butter and golden syrup over a low heat.

In a small bowl, dissolve the bicarbonate soda in 2tbsp of boiling water. Combine with the golden syrup and butter.

Make a well in the centre of the dry ingredients, and pour in the warm golden syrup mixture, mixing well until it forms a dough.

Take a heaped teaspoon of the mixture and roll into balls. Place onto the baking tray and press down slightly to flatten. Repeat until all the mixture has been used up – little hands will make light work of rolling the dough into balls – and then flatten down into cookies.

Place into the preheated oven for 15-20 minutes, until the biscuits are golden.

Once baked, remove and place straight onto a wire rack to cool before serving.

 

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Kid-Friendly_Summer-Fun_Heather_44235

50 Healthiest Snacks

Snacks can be a dieter’s best friend, if you choose the right ones. The list below offers 50 between-meal bites that will help you stay slim and satisfied. Those marked with an * contain a protein, fiber, calcium or antioxidants to keep your body at its best. The rest will help fend off a craving without a lot of added fat, sugar or calories. No matter what you choose, you’ll lose (weight, that is)

 

Sate a salt craving

  • 23 almonds (162 calories)*
    This is our top savory super snack because it offers fiber, heart-healthy fats and vitamin E, which may help your body bounce back post-workout. The nuts also pack alpha-linolenic acid, which revs your body’s fat-burning ability.
  • 5 olives (any kind) (45 calories)
  • 1 small Martin’s pretzel (50 calories)
  • 2 oz Applegate Honey and Maple Turkey Breast wrapped around 2 bread-and-butter pickles (80 calories)*
  • 1/4 cup hummus, 3 carrot sticks (80 calories)*
  • 1 Wasa Multigrain Crispbread topped with 1 tbsp avocado and 1 tbsp hummus (80 calories)*
  • 6 steamed medium asparagus spears topped with 1 tablespoon toasted almond slivers (80 calories)*
  • 1/3 cup 1/2-inch-thick potato slices tossed with 1 teaspoon olive oil and a pinch of finely chopped rosemary, baked at 450 for 30 minutes (80 calories)*
  • 1/4 cup black beans combined with 1 tbsp salsa, 1 tbsp cottage cheese and 1/2 tbsp guacamole; savor with 4 celery stalks (80 calories)*
  • 1/4 cup 1/4-inch-thick cucumber slices, tossed with 3 oz nonfat plain yogurt, 2 tsp chopped cashews, 1 tsp lemon juice and 1 tsp finely chopped fresh dill (80 calories)*
  • 1/2 slice whole-wheat toast brushed with 1/2 tsp olive oil, topped with 1 tbsp Greek yogurt and a mixture of 3 tbsp diced tomatoes with a pinch of chopped garlic and basil (80 calories)*
  • 1 Laughing Cow Light Swiss Original wedge, 3 pieces Kavli Crispy Thin (85 calories)*
  • One 1-oz package tuna jerky (90 calories)*
  • 1 oz buffalo mozzarella, 1/2 cup cherry or grape tomatoes (94 calories)*
  • 1 bag Baked! Cheetos 100 Calorie Mini Bites (100 calories)
  • 15 Eden’s Nori Maki Crackers rice crackers (110 calories)
  • 1 cup unshelled edamame (120 calories)*
  • 25 Eden’s Vegetable Chips (140 calories)
  • 1/4 cup Trader Joe’s Chili con Queso, 18 baked tortilla chips (140 calories)
  • 1/2 cup pumpkin seeds in shell (143 calories)*
  • 2 pieces (30 grams) prosciutto, 4 dried figs (154 calories)*
  • 9 cashews (180 calories)*
  • 1 Subway Turkey Breast Wrap (190 calories)*

Satisfy a sweet tooth

  • 8 oz plain yogurt (110 calories, 0 g fat)*
    This get-skinny staple is the ultimate sweet snack. The mix of carbs and protein in lowfat yogurt keep blood sugar level, stave off hunger and helps your body store less fat. Add fresh berries for flavor and a punch of antioxidants.
  • 1 Fla-Vor-Ice Lite Sugar-Free (5 calories)
  • 10 frozen grapes (20 calories)*
  • 1 package Original Apple Nature Valley Fruit Crisps (50 calories)
  • 10 strawberries rolled in confectioners’ sugar (71 calories)*
  • 1 packet O’Coco’s Mocha cookies (90 calories)
  • 1 Strawberry Froz Fruit bar (90 calories)*
  • 1 Jelly Belly 100-calorie pack (100 calories)
  • One 100-calorie pack Trader Joe’s Chocolate Graham Toucan Cookies (100 calories)
  • One 100-calorie Balance Bar (100 calories)*
  • 2 Raspberry Newtons (100 calories)*
  • 1 Starbucks Mocha Frappuccino bar (120 calories)
  • 1 package Back to Nature Honey Graham Sticks (120 calories)
  • 1/2 banana rolled in 1 tbsp frozen semisweet chocolate chips (123 calories)*
  • 2 tbsp Better ‘n Peanut Butter, 4 stalks celery (124 calories)*
  • 1 bag Orville Redenbacher’s Smart Pop Butter Mini Bags topped with a spritz of butter spray and 1 tsp sugar (126 calories)*
  • 1 candy apple with coconut shavings (130 calories)*
  • 1/2 cup sliced pears with marshmallow cream topping (139 calories)*
  • 24 Annie’s Chocolate Chip Bunny Graham cookies (140 calories)
  • Half of a 1.08-oz container of M&M’s Minis mixed with 1/3 cup lowfat granola (145 calories)
  • 3/4 cup Cocoa Pebbles with 1/2 cup skim milk (157 calories)*
  • 1 cup apple slices dipped in 2 tbsp caramel topping (160 calories)*
  • 4 Entenmann’s chocolate chip cookies (160 calories)
  • 1 McDonald’s Fruit ‘n Yogurt Parfait (160 calories)*
  • 1 vanilla-almond shake: Blend 1/2 cup skim milk with 1/2 cup frozen yogurt and 1 drop almond extract (165 calories)*
  • 3/4 cup warm apple sauce (165 calories)*
  • 1 cup lowfat chocolate milk*
 

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clip-art-playing-children-844160

Easy Exercise Ideas

Does your child spend far too much of his or her free time watching TV or playing video games? Experts advise that two hours of TV or video games a day should be the limit to better assure kids will be healthy, strong, and creative.

Here is a quick reference list of some easy and fun exercise ideas to help children get active (often without even knowing they are exercising!):

1. Walk your dog 
2. Walk your neighbor’s dog (with permission from your parents and your neighbor, of course)
3. Fly a kite 
4. Toss a Frisbee 
5. Ask your parents or grandparents to take you to a state park or other area where you can take a nature hike 
6. Ride your bike 
7. Skate 
8. If you have a yard, pick up sticks or trash 
9. Pull weeds 
10. Rake the yard or garden 
11. Play tag 
12. Play hopscotch 
13. Have a hula hoop contest, and see who can keep the hoop up the longest 
14. Learn to juggle 
15. Jump rope (boxers do it, and look how strong & healthy they are!)
16. Visit the zoo, amusement park, or museum (lots of walking)
17. Wash the car 
18. Have every family member wear a pedometer, and have a daily challenge to see who can take the most steps. Losers do winner’s chores the next day.
19. Shoot hoops 
20. Play soccer 
21. Play softball 
22. Play badminton 
23. Have a water balloon fight 
24. Put on your bathing suit and run through the sprinkler 
25. Go swimming (never without an adult to supervise!)
26. Give the dog a bath. The bigger the dog, the more exercise you’ll get!
27. Sign up for a charity walk-a-thon with your parent, grandparent, or other relative 
28. Do jumping jacks 
29. Do push-ups 
30. Put on an exercise video and get a good workout 
31. Do sit-ups 
32. Learn to play golf, or caddy for someone else 
33. Play tennis 
34. Play miniature golf 
35. Go bowling 
36. Learn to twirl a baton 
37. Take a class in martial arts and learn to defend yourself 
38. Build a fort and play cowboys and Indians 
39. If you have a two-story home or a home with a basement, carry out-of-place items up or down stairs, one item at a time 
40. Run the vacuum 
41. Wash windows 
42. Clean your room 
43. Ride your skateboard 
44. Learn yoga, either at a class or from a video 
45. Race-walk 
46. Have relay races with your friends or family 
47. Play touch football 
48. Learn ballroom dancing 
49. Learn hip-hop dancing 
50. Take classes in ballet, jazz, or tap dancing

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BACK TO SCOOL

School is a large part of your life when you are young, and it can be a really happy experience. Sometimes though you might find you have problems at school which are worrying or upsetting you. These could be about friends, homework, exams, bullying, or feeling pressure to do well. No matter what you are feeling, ChildLine is always here for you if you need support.

School

Going back to school

It can be really hard going back to school after the summer holidays. Not everyone looks forward to it. There might be lots of reasons why you might be worried about going back such as:

Whatever the reason, ChildLine is here for you and can help. You can contact us any time for support.

Moving schools

Moving from one school to another can be a scary time.  You might be moving from primary school to secondary school, or changing schools because you have moved house. Whatever the reason for the move, you can prepare yourself and get support if you need it, to make it all go smoothly. 

I’m worried about moving up to secondary school

The change from primary school to secondary school can be scary. You might be worried about:

It’s natural to feel like this, even if lots of your friends are moving to the same school as you. 

Hopefully you will get a chance to have a look round your new school and spend a day there. If you are able to do this, it will help you feel more confident about when you move.  The receptionists in your school’s office should be able to help you if you get lost and can’t find where you are supposed to go, or you lose something like your dinner money. They can help you find your way round and also be able to help with some of the other problems you might have too.

If you are worried about anything to do with moving to secondary school, it can really help to talk to someone about how you feel. You could talk to your teacher – either your primary school teacher, or your new secondary school teacher.  They will be able to help you feel happier about the move.  You could also talk to your parents or carers about how you feel.

If you don’t have anyone to talk to, or don’t feel that you can talk to them about how you feel, you can always talk to ChildLine. No matter what your worry about moving schools is, we can help you.  

 

Friends 

Some people make it look easy making friends, but it isn’t always easy.  Not having friends or being in a group can make you feel sad and lonely. If you  are worried about making friends, or don’t have any friends at your school, talking about it to someone can help. Read more advice about friends 

Being bullied? 

Girl being bullied by mobile phoneIf you are being bullied you may feel alone and not know where to turn.  If you are being bullied at school, it can make each day at school difficult and worrying.

No one has the right to hurt you or make you feel bad, and if you are being bullied you don’t have to put up with it.

You can speak to ChildLine anytime if you are being bullied and want to talk about it. We can help you if you are being bullied at school,outside of school, if you are feeling down or lonely, or if you are havingproblems with friends.

 

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